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Books Books 51 - 60 of 183 on In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view that which....
" In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest of every true American, the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence. "
THE HISTORY OF THE RISE, PROGRESS, AND ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF ... - Page 410
by William Gordon - 1801
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Introduction to the Science of Government, and Compend of the Constitutional ...

Andrew White Young - Economics - 1839 - 336 pages
...congress the result of their labors, the framers say : " In all our deliberations we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest...felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence." 182. The above resolution in favor of a national government was strenuously opposed by several members...
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Debates in the Federal convention, from Tuesday, August 7th, 1787, until its ...

James Madison - Constitutional history - 1842
...kept steadily in our view that which appeared to us the greatest interest of every true American, thq consolidation of our union, in which is involved our...led each State in the Convention to be less rigid in points of inferior magnitude, than might have been otherwise expected. And thus the Constitution,...
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Southern Quarterly Review, Volume 26

Daniel Kimball Whitaker, Milton Clapp, William Gilmore Simms, James Henley Thornwell - 1854
...paragraph, quoted by Mr. Calhoun, he says : "In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest...true American — the consolidation of our Union." Here we have, in the first citation, an express declaration that the peoples of the several States...
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The Governmental History of the United States of America: From the Earliest ...

Henry Sherman - United States - 1843 - 282 pages
...extent, habits, and particular interests. In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view, that which appears to us the greatest interest...inferior magnitude, than might have been otherwise expected ; and thus the Constitution, which we now present, is the result of a spirit of amity, and...
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THE DUBLIN UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE. No. CXXVII. JULY, 1843. VOL. XXII.

The Dublin University Magazine.VOL.XXII July to December,1843 - 1843
...habits, and particular interests. 41 In all onr deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest...which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, and perhaps our national existence. This important consideration, seriously and deeply impressed on...
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Lectures on Constitutional Law: For the Use of the Law Class at the ...

Henry St. George Tucker - Constitutional law - 1843 - 242 pages
...) — ' In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view that, which appeared to us the greatest interest of every true American,...felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence.' Could this be attained consistently with the notion of an existing treaty or confederacy, which each...
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Constitution of the United States ... as Proposed by the Convention ... 1787 ...

United States. Congress. House - Parliamentary practice - 1844 - 89 pages
...extent, habits, end. particular interests. In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest...inferior magnitude than might have been otherwise expected ; and thus the Constitution which we now present is the result of a spirit of amity, and of...
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Secret Proceedings and Debates of the Convention Assembled at Philadelphia ...

United States. Constitutional Convention, Robert Yates - Constitutional history - 1844 - 335 pages
...extent, habits, and particular interests. In all cur deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view, that which appears to us the greatest interest...to be less rigid on points of inferior magnitude, tluui might have been otherwise expected; and thus the constitution, which we now present, is the result...
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A Treatise on International Law: And a Short Explanation of the Jurisdiction ...

Daniel Gardner - Constitutional law - 1844 - 315 pages
...1787, transmitting the Constitution agreed on by the Convention, says, that the aim of that body was, " the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved...felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence." The great end of enlarging the powers of the federal government was to perfect the union of the thirteen...
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The Governmental Instructor: Or, A Brief and Comprehensive View of the ...

J. B. Shurtleff - United States - 1846 - 182 pages
...extent, habits, and particular interests. In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our vie"w that which appears to us the greatest interest...inferior magnitude than might have been otherwise expected ; and thus, the constitution which we now present is the result of a spirit of amity, and...
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