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Books Books 101 - 110 of 117 on In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view that which....
" In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view that which appears to us the greatest interest of every true American, the consolidation of our Union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence. "
THE HISTORY OF THE RISE, PROGRESS, AND ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INDEPENDENCE OF ... - Page 410
by William Gordon - 1801
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The Tenth Amendment and State Sovereignty: Constitutional History and ...

Mark Robert Killenbeck - History - 2002 - 198 pages
...the Union" were, accordingly, to be "fully and effectively vested" in that entity, consistent with "that which appears to us the greatest interest of...prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence."188 And individual state interests that might prove "particularly disagreeable or injurious...
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Internal Improvement: National Public Works and the Promise of Popular ...

John Lauritz Larson - Political Science - 2001 - 324 pages
...there was no higher purpose in the founding than " ''the consolidation of our Union [Clay's emphasis], in which is involved our prosperity, felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence.' " Especially with the rise of the West, where a scarcity of capital and enormous developmental needs...
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To Form A More Perfect Union: A New Economic Interpretation of the United ...

Robert A. McGuire - Business & Economics - 2003 - 416 pages
...extent, habits, and particular interests. In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view, that which appears to us the greatest interest...inferior magnitude, than might have been otherwise expected; and thus the Constitution, which we now present, is the result of a spirit of amity, and...
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Journal of the Federal Convention

United States. Constitutional Convention, James Madison - Biography & Autobiography - 2003 - 805 pages
...difference among the several States, as to their situation, extent, habits, and particular interests. union, in which is involved our prosperity, felicity,...led each State in the Convention to be less rigid in points of inferior magnitude, than might have been otherwise expected. And thus the Constitution...
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Gouverneur Morris: An Independent Life

William Howard Adams - Biography & Autobiography - 2008 - 368 pages
...Situation Extent Habits and particular Interests," the Convention had, Morris wrote, "kept steadily in our View that which appears to us the greatest Interest...Prosperity Felicity Safety perhaps our national Existence." Above all, the Constitution now presented was, in Morris's best diplomatic gloss, the "Result of a...
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European Constitutionalism Beyond the State

KATHLEEN WEILER - Law - 2003 - 244 pages
...extent, habits, and particular interests. In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in view, that which appears to us the greatest interest...felicity, safety, perhaps our national existence.' In L. Wolf-Phillips (ed.), Constitutions of Modern States: Selected Texts (London: Pall Mall Press,...
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The Papers of John C. Calhoun, Volume 28

John Caldwell Calhoun, William Edwin Hemphill, Clyde Norman Wilson, South Caroliniana Society - History - 1959 - 320 pages
...laying it before Congress, they say,— "In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view, that which appears to us, the greatest interest...every true American, the consolidation of our union." "Our union," can refer to no other than the then existing union,— the old union of the confederacy,...
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John C. Calhoun: Selected Writings and Speeches

John Caldwell Calhoun - History - 2003 - 725 pages
...laying it before Congress, they say, — "In all our deliberations on this subject, we kept steadily in our view, that which appears to us, the greatest interest...every true American, the consolidation of our union." "Our union," can refer to no other than the then existing union, — the old union of the confederacy,...
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George Washington: The Man of the Age

John P. Kaminski - Presidents - 2004 - 60 pages
...by the convention to explain the convention's actions: "In all our deliberations we kept steadily in our view, that which appears to us the greatest interest...safety, perhaps our national existence. This important considerat1on, seriously and deeply impressed on our minds, led each State in the Convention to be...
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The Antifederalists: Critics of the Constitution, 1781-1788

Jackson Turner Main - History - 2004 - 308 pages
...sent forth with the Constitution read, "In all our deliberations on this subject we kept steadily in our view, that which appears to us the greatest interest...every true American, the consolidation of our Union," Ford, ed., Journals of Congress, XXXIII, 502. The word may have been innocently used, in the sense...
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