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Books Books 71 - 80 of 174 on I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf....
" I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf ; And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour,... "
The Pictorial edition of the works of Shakspere, ed. by C. Knight. [8 vols ... - Page 52
by William Shakespeare - 1867
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The Modern British Essayists: Jeffrey, Francis. Contributions to the ...

English essays - 1852
...; and he calls back all our sympathy by that fine close of thoughtful melancholy. " My way of life t, et le plut honnête homme in the universe ; although...spent five minutes together on either prose or verse. dares not!" — pp.26 — 30. In treating of the Julius Cœsar, Mr. H. extracts the following short...
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1852
....'—This push Will cheer me ever, or disseat me now. I have liv'd long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear,' the yellow leaf: And that which should...mouth-honour, breath. Which the poor heart would fain deny, outdare not. Sejton ! Enter Seyton. Sey. What is your gracious pleasure ? Macb. ' What news more ?...
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Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 418 pages
...never to heaven go. H. iii. 3. GUILTY CAREER, THE CLOSE OF A. 1 have liv'd long enough ; my way of life Is fallen into the sear, the yellow leaf ; And that...mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, but dare not. X. v. 3. • — PURSUITS. What win the guilty, gaining what they seek ? A dream, a breath,...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with a ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...This push Will cheer me ever, or disseat me now. I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf: And that which should...mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, but dare not. Seyton !— Enter SEYTON. Sey. What is your gracious pleasure ? Macb. What news more...
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A cyclopædia of poetical quotations, arranged by H.G. Adams

Cyclopaedia - 1853 - 733 pages
...eyes, sans taste, sans every thing. Shakspere. I have lived long enough: my way of life Has fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf; And that which should...mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain cling to, but dare not. Shakspere. AGE. 25 Though now this grained face of mine he hid In safe consuming...
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The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare, Thomas Price - 1853 - 575 pages
...better, at thy leisure. 34— ii. 4, 165. Aye, premature. My May of life Is fall'n into the searl, the yellow leaf: And that which should accompany old...deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would feign deny, but dare not. 15 — T. 3. 166. Age. Time hath not yet so dried this blood of mine, Nor...
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1854
...cheer me ever, or disseat me now. [ have liv'd long enough : my way of life Is fallen into the s«»T,3 the yellow leaf: And that which should accompany old...mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, butdare not. Seylon ! Enter Seyton. Sey. What is your gracious pleasure ? JV/ac6. What news more ?...
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Great Truths by great Authors

1856
...in the World's regard, wretched and low. e, — Mallet. . — Shakspeare. MY May of life Is fall'n into the sear, the yellow leaf : And that which should...Mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, but dare not. e. — Shakspeare. JV/TY blood, my want of strength, my sick heart, shows That I must...
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LECTURES ON ENGLISH HISTORY AND TRAGIC POETRY

HENRY REED - 1856
...cheer me ever, or disseat me now. I have lived long enough : my way of life Is fallen into the sere the yellow leaf: And that which should accompany old...mouth-honour, breath Which the poor heart would fain deny, but dare not." He finds that he has been paltered with by the double senses of sorcery. The sea of...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspere, from the text of Johnson, Stevens ...

William Shakespeare - 1856
...This push Will cheer me ever, or disseat me now. I have liv'd long enough : my way of life Is fall'n nce of the night? Stepk. A friend. Lor. A friend.'...my name ; and I bring word, My mistress will before [dare not. Which the poor heart would fain deny, but Seyton! Enter SEYTON. Sty. What is your gracious...
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