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" The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny. "
Scrap Book on Law and Politics, Men and Times - Page 132
by George Robertson - 1855 - 404 pages
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James Madison: The Theory and Practice of Republican Government

Samuel Kernell - History - 2005 - 381 pages
...Number 51s checks and balances. IE NUMBER 51: INSTITUTIONALIZING SEPARATION OF POWERS From Number 47: "The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive,...justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny." Par. I : With "exterior provisions found to be inadequate" in the earlier essays, the solution must...
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Faith and Liberty: The Economic Thought of the Late Scholastics

Alejandro Antonio Chafuen - Business & Economics - 2003 - 171 pages
...understood the dangers of unlimited majority rule and of any other unlimited form of government as well. "The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive,...justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny." The Federalist Papers no. 47. Late-scholastic ideas on government duties and the people's rights were...
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History of American Political Thought

Bryan-Paul Frost, Jeffrey Sikkenga - Political Science - 2003 - 834 pages
...text as SL. 9. In The Federalist no. 47, 324, Madison expresses the Montesquieuean idea very clearly: "The accumulation of all powers legislative, executive...whether of one, a few or many, and whether hereditary, self appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny." 1 0. The Montesquieuean...
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Party government...: American Government in Action

Elmer Eric Schattschneider - Political parties - 1960 - 219 pages
...the problem as the tyranny to be avoided if the declared ends of a liberal regime were to be secured. "The accumulation of all powers legislative, executive...whether of one, a few or many, and whether hereditary, self appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny." (Fed. 47) The...
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The Federalist: With Letters of Brutus

Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay - History - 2003 - 575 pages
...with the authority of more enlightened patrons of liberty than that on which the objection is founded. The accumulation of all powers legislative, executive...whether of one, a few or many, and whether hereditary, self appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny. Were the federal...
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Cato Handbook for Congress: Policy Recommendations for the 108th Congress

Cato Institute, Edward H. Crane, David Boaz - Political Science - 2003 - 676 pages
...that it was a necessary prerequisite for "a government of laws and not of men." Further, he wrote, ' 'The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive,...the same hands, whether of one, a few, or many, and 77 whether hereditary, self-appointed, or elective, may justly be pronounced I the very definition...
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African Americans and Political Participation: A Reference Handbook

Minion K. C. Morrison - Political Science - 2003 - 400 pages
...be united by a common interest, the rights of the minority will be insecure." According to Madison, "the accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive,...and judiciary, in the same hands, whether of one, of few, or many," is defined as tyranny. Guinier goes on to show that such a "tyranny of the majority"...
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The Right to Privacy: Rights and Liberties Under the Law

Richard A. Glenn - Law - 2003 - 399 pages
...of Montesquieu's concerns regarding the concentration of power, Madison wrote in Federalist No. 47 that "the accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive, and judiciary, in the same hands . . . may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny." As such, the Constitution assigns the...
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Agenda for the Nation

Henry Aaron, James M. Lindsay, Pietro S. Nivola - Political Science - 2003 - 432 pages
...indefensible as a matter of policy."7 It brings to mind James Madison's assertion in Federalist 47 that "the accumulation of all powers legislative, executive and judiciary in the same hands . . . may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny." — Ashcroft's roundup in the fall...
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American Constitutional Law: Essays, Cases, and Comparative Notes

Donald P. Kommers, John E. Finn, Gary J. Jacobsohn - Political Science - 2004 - 1095 pages
...founders/ In justifying separation of powers, James Madison, following Locke, wrote in Federalist 47: "The accumulation of all powers, legislative, executive,...justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny. "л The View of the Framers Madison remains America's preeminent theorist of separated powers. It is...
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