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" Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call to-day his own : He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived today. Be fair or foul, or rain or shine, The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine. Not Heaven itself... "
The Odes of Horace: In Four Books Translated Into English Lyric Verse - Page 378
by Horace - 1858 - 475 pages
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The British Essayists: Adventurer

Lionel Thomas Berguer - English essays - 1823
...TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1752. Ille potens sui Laetusque deget, cui licet in diem Dixisse, vixi. — Hon. Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call to-day his own ; Hei who secure within can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have lived to-day. — DRYDEN. 'To THE...
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The British Essayists: Adventurer

English essays - 1823
...deget, cui licet in diem Dixisae, vixi. Hon. Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can cull to day his own ; He who secure within can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for 1 have lived to-day. DRYDKN. " TO THE ADVENTURER. "SIR, " IT is the fate of all who do not live in...
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The Adventurer, Volume 1

1823
...cui licet in diem Vixisse, i'ij-'f, Hon. Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can cull to day his own ; He who secure within can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for 1 have lived to-day. DRTDEN. "TO THE ADVENTURER. "SIR, " IT is the fate of all who do not live in necessary...
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The British Essayists: Rambler

Lionel Thomas Berguer - English essays - 1823
...Quodcunque retro cst, efficict ; neque Diffinget, infectumque reddet, Quod fugiens seiuel bora vexit. Be fair or foul, or rain or shine, The joys I have possess'd in spite of fate are mine. Not heav'n itself upon the past has pow'r, But what has been,...
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An Historical Inquiry Into the Principal Circumstances and Events Relative ...

Barclay Mounteney - 1824 - 539 pages
...the name of any man, and transmute that which is, into that which had long ceased to exist ? — " Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine, The joys I have possess'd at least are mine ; Not Heav'n itself upon the past has pow'r ; What has been has been, and...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson: The Rambler

Samuel Johnson - English literature - 1825
...tfliciet : neque Diflinsret, infectumque reddet, Quodfugiens seinel horn veiit. HOK. lib. isi. Od-29. 45. Be fair or foul, or rain or shine, The joys I have possess'd, in spite of fate, are mine. Not heav'n itself upon the past has pow'r, But what has been...
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Thoughts on Man, His Nature, Productions, and Discoveries: Interspersed with ...

William Godwin - Human beings - 1831 - 471 pages
...regard them as of no account. Taken in this sense, Drvden-s celebrated verses are but a maniac-s rant: J To-morrow, do thy worst, for I have lived to-day :...joys I have possessed, in spite of fate are mine. Not heaven itself upon the past has power, But what has been has been, and I have had my hour. But this...
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The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Volume 3

John Dryden - 1832
...woods, made thin with winds, their scatter'd honours mourn. Happy the man, and happy he alone, fis He, who can call to-day his own : He who, secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for I have liv'd to-day. Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine, [mine. The joys I have possess'd, in spite of fate,...
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The Works of John Dryden: In Verse and Prose, with a Life, Volume 1

John Dryden - 1837
...are from their old foundations torn, And woods, made thin with winds, their scatter'd honours mourn. Happy the man, and happy he alone, He, who can call...secure within, can say, To-morrow do thy worst, for l have liv'd to-day. Be fair, or foul, or rain, or shine, The joys l have possess'd, in spite of fate,...
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The Edinburgh Christian Instructor, Volume 22

Christianity
...you must feel that the very height of human ambition must be to realize the language of the poet. " Happy the man, and happy he alone, He who can call to-day hia own ; lie who unmoved within can say To-morrow do thy worst, for 1 have lived to-day. Come foul...
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