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" By the sweet power of music: therefore the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones and floods; Since nought so stockish, hard and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature. "
The plays of William Shakspeare, with the corrections and illustr. of ... - Page 419
by William Shakespeare - 1805
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The works of Virgil, closely rendered into Engl. rhythm and ..., Volume 1

Publius Vergilius Maro - 1855
...they would not have come under the jealous lash of Lorenzo ; Shakspeare, Merchant of Venice, v. 1 : -' Therefore the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees,...Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature : The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not mov'd...
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The English Journal of Education, Volume 10

Education - 1856
...perceive them make a mutual stand, Their savage eyes turned to a modest gaze By the sweet power of music. Therefore the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees,...Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music, for the time, doth change his nature. The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved...
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The philosophy of William Shakespeare delineating in seven hundred and fifty ...

William Shakespeare - 1857
...trumpet sound, Or any air of musick touch their ears, You shall perceive them make a mutual stand, Their savage eyes turn'd to a modest gaze, By the...himself, Nor is not mov'd with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils ; The motions of his spirit are dull as night, And his...
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Class Book of Poetry: Consisting of Selections from Distinguished English ...

John Seely Hart - Readers - 1857 - 384 pages
...vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it. Music. (From the Merchant of Venice.) Therefore, the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees,...Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature: The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved...
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The Complete Works of Shakspeare, Revised from the Best ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1857
...perceive them make a mutual stand, Their savage eyes turned to a modest gaze By the sweet power of music. Therefore, the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees,...Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature. The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved...
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The Beautiful in Nature, Art, and Life, Volume 1

Andrew James Symington - Aesthetics - 1857
...fathoming the deepest depths of its primary and ultimate significance, thus conclusively writes : — " Therefore, the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees,...Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature : The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved...
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Shakspere's Werke, herausg. und erklärt von N. Delius ..., Part 154, Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1858
...them make a mutual 1+ stand, Their savage eyes turn'd to a modest gaze, By the sweet power of music: therefore, the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees,...Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature. The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not mov'd...
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Select specimens of the English poets, ed. by A. De Vere

Aubrey Thomas De Vere - 1858
...them make a mutual stand ; Their savage eyes turned to a modest gaze, By the sweet power of music. Therefore the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees,...Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change its nature. The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not mov'd...
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The Shakespearean Plays of Edwin Booth, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - Promptbooks - 1899
...perceive them make a mutual stand, Their savage eyes turn'd to modest gaze By the sweet power of music. Therefore the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees,...Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature. The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved...
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