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" That skins the vice o' the top. Go to your bosom ; Knock there ; and ask your heart what it doth know That's like my brother's fault ; if it confess A natural guiltiness such as is his, Let it not sound a thought upon your tongue Against my brother's... "
The Director [ed. by T.F. Dibdin]. - Page 231
edited by - 1807
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Shakespeare's Heroines

Anna Murphy Jameson - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 464 pages
...soldier is flat blasphemy. Authority, although it err like others, Hath yet a kind of medicine in itself, Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know...fault: if it confess A natural guiltiness, such as his is, Let it not sound a thought upon your tongue Against my brother's life. Let me be ignorant,...
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Shakespeare's Rhetoric of Comic Character: Dramatic Convention in Classical ...

Karen Newman - Literary Criticism - 2005 - 168 pages
...next long speech, Isabella moves from the impersonal man to the personal: 'Go to your bosom,/Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know/ That's like my brother's fault' (II, ii, 137-9). Ironically, as his soliloquy demonstrates, Angelo heeds her words and discovers his...
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Children's Classic Tales

Various - Fairy tales - 2004 - 912 pages
...suffers it. Go to your own bosom, my lord; knock there, and ask your heart what it does know that is like my brother's fault; if it confess a natural guiltiness such as his is, let it not sound a thought against my brother's life!' Her last words more moved Angelo than...
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Perspectives on Politics in Shakespeare

John Albert Murley, Sean D. Sutton - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 265 pages
...self-knowledge, that he is already doing that).32 In accord with Matthew, Isabella pleads with him: "Go to your bosom, / Knock there, and ask your heart...it confess / A natural guiltiness, such as is his, / Let it not sound a thought upon your tongue / Against my brother's life" (II.ii. 137-1 42). And trying...
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Infirm Glory: Shakespeare and the Renaissance Image of Man

Sukanta Chaudhuri - Didactic drama, English - 1981 - 231 pages
...the woman has not sinned through adultery, but that there is no innocent man to cast the first stone. Go to your bosom. Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know That's like my brother's fault. (II. ii. 136-8) Escalus had said the same thing earlier: Let but your honour know, Whom I believe to...
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An Actor's Edition of Shakespeare Revisited

James R. Hartman - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2007 - 516 pages
...authority, though it err like others, Hath yet a kind of medicine in itself That covers over it's own vice. Go to your bosom: Knock there and ask your heart what...it doth know That's like my brother's fault. If it owns A natural guiltiness such as is his, Let it not sound a thought upon your tongue Against my brother...
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Seeming Knowledge: Shakespeare and Skeptical Faith

John D. Cox - Literary Criticism - 2007 - 348 pages
...mete, it shall be measured to you again" (Matt 7:l-2).45 "Go to your bosom," Isabella urges Angelo, "Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know / That's like my brother's fault" (2.2.141-43). When Angelo finds such a fault in himself, he denies it publicly, as Berowne does, until...
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