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" As, in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious ; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, God save him... "
細說莎士比亞論文集: a collection of essays - Page 76
by 彭鏡禧 - 2004 - 470 pages
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Elements of Elocution: In which the Principles of Reading and Speaking are ...

John Walker - Elocution - 1810 - 379 pages
...See p. 314, 315. Pity in plaintive (iarra(ian. As in a theatre the eyes of men, After a wcll-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that...or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cry'd God save him ; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home : But dust was thrown...
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Life of Torquato Tasso: With an Historical and Critical Account of ..., Volume 2

John Black - 1810
...this instance which is asserted by Shakespeare. In a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious. 1 What then are we to conclude from the dedication of Aldus, but that * Viene a Roma un Miracolo di...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the ..., Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1811
...poor Richard! where rides he the while ? York. As, in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent* on him that...or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him ; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home: But dust was thrown...
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Comedy of errors. Macbeth. King John. King Richard II. King Henry IV., part I

William Shakespeare - 1811
...poor Richard ! where rides he the while ? York. As in a theatre,1 the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that...or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him ; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome homei : But dust was thrown...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: In Nine Volumes, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1810
...poor Richard ! where rides he the while f York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that...or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him ; No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home : But dust was thrown...
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Aphorisms from Shakespeare

William Shakespeare, Capel Lofft - 1812 - 456 pages
...Love not near. 3078. POPULARITY — variable. 3f. As in a Theatre the Eyes of Men, After a well-grac'd Actor leaves the Stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious ; So popular Favor waits on chance and change. 3079- JUSTICE and FORBEARANCE toward RELATIONS. Ot As...
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The Beauties of England and Wales: Or Delineations, Topographical ...

John Britton - Architecture - 1812
...poor Richard, where rides he the while ? York. At in a theatre the eyes of men, After a well gruc'd actor leaves the stage. Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious: Ev'n so, or with much more contempt, men's eyei Did scowl on Richard : no man cry'd, God save him !...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1813 - 913 pages
...the eyes of men, After a well grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters iK-it, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him ; Ко joyful tongue gave him his welcome home: But dust was thrown...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1813
...men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, * Are idly bout on him that enters uext, Thiukiog his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eves Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him; \u jovl.ul tongue gave him his welcome home...
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Elements of Criticism, Volume 2

Lord Henry Home Kames - Criticism - 1816
...tongues cry'd, God save thee, Bolingbroke. Dutchess. Alas! poor Richard, where rides he the while 1 York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced...or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard: no man cry'd, God save him ! No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home ; But dust was thrown...
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