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" As, in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious ; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, God save him... "
細說莎士比亞論文集: a collection of essays - Page 76
by 彭鏡禧 - 2004 - 470 pages
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“The” Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 8

William Shakespeare - 1806
...doing, thns he pass'd along. Din /i, Alas, poor Richard ! where rides he the while? After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage. Are idly bent, on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedions : Even so , or with much more contempt, men's eyes, Did scowl on Richard) no man cried, God...
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London; Being an Accurate History and Description of the British ..., Volume 3

David Hughson - London (England) - 1806
...the procession of the usurper Henry of Lancaster with the deposed Richard II. through this street : - Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard. No man said, " God save him !" No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home, But dust was thrown...
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London, by David Hughson, Volume 3

Edward Pugh - 1806
...the procession of the usurper Henry of Lancaster with the deposed Richard II. through this street : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard. No man saul, " God save him !" No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home, But dust was thrown...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Issue 6

William Shakespeare - 1806
...poor Richard ! where rides he the while ? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next 47, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl...
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Macbeth. King John. King Richard II.-v. 2. King Henry IV. King Henry V.-v. 3 ...

William Shakespeare - 1807
...Richard ! where rides he the while? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, • After a well grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : VOL. vi. s Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With Explanatory Notes ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, Samuel Ayscough - 1807
...' ic to be never the nigher : or, to make no advance toward* tbr good desired. F f 2 Are idly bent1 on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : Even so, orwilh much more contempt, men's eye Did scowl on Richard; no man cry 'd, God save him No joyful tongue...
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The Memoirs of Charles Westcote: In which is Introduced the History of the ...

French fiction - 1807 - 323 pages
...the fatal secret of her birth. CHAPTER XXXV. —' In a theatre the eyes of men, " After a well grac'd actor leaves the stage, " Are idly bent on him that enters next." T was the intention of the Editor, to have laid before tbe Public a continuation of his life ; but...
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The Works of John Dryden: Now First Collected ...

John Dryden, Walter Scott - English literature - 1808
...in it; and refrain from pity, if you can : As in a theatre, tlie eyes of men, After a. well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that...or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard : no mancry'd, God save him: Mo joyful tongue gave him his welcpme home, But dust was thrown...
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The Speaker; Or Miscellaneous Pieces: Selected from the Best English Writers ...

William Enfield - Elocution - 1808 - 400 pages
...poor Richard, where rides he the white ? York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, . Are idly bent on him that...next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or^ith n%ch more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl o»RMfcrti; no.mautry'd/God save him! No joyful tongue...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1810
...poor Richard ! where rides he the while .' York. As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that...or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard ; no man cried, God save him ; Ko joyful tongue gave him his welcome home : But dust was thrown...
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