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" As, in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious ; Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, God save him... "
細說莎士比亞論文集: a collection of essays - Page 76
by 彭鏡禧 - 2004 - 470 pages
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The Works of John Dryden, Volume 13

John Dryden - English drama - 1956
...from pitty if you can. As in a Theatre, the eyes of men After a well-grac'd Actor leaves the Stage, 20 Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his...to be tedious: Even so, or with much more contempt, mens eyes Did scowl on Richard: no man cry'd God save him: No joyful tongue gave him his welcom home,...
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The Tragedy of King Richard the Second

William Shakespeare - Drama - 2000 - 113 pages
...eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, 24 Are idly bent on him that enters next, 25 Thinking his prattle to be tedious, Even so, or with...contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on gentle Richard. No man cried, "God save him!" No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home, But dust was thrown upon...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: A Thematic Guide

Victor L. Cahn - Drama - 2001 - 361 pages
...should stain so fair a show! (Ill, iii, 68-71) Once Richard has abdicated, York completes the image: As in a theatre the eyes of men, After a well-graced...contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on gentle Richard. (V, ii, 23-27) In his final soliloquy, the King at last sees the truth: Thus play I in one person many...
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Shakespeare: la invención de lo humano

Harold Bloom - Characters and characteristics in literature - 2001 - 734 pages
...lament the cause. [IV.i. 276-302] 17. York. As in a theatre the eyes of men, / After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, / Are idly bent on him that...with much more contempt, men's eyes / Did scowl on Richard. No man cried "God save him!" / No joyful tongue gave him welcome home, / But dust was thrown...
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The Life and Death of King Richard II

William Shakespeare - 2001 - 500 pages
...passion] before I do justice to that Divine Poet, After a well grac'd A&or leaues the Stage, 27 Are idlely bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : Euen fo, or with much more contempt, mens eyes 30 Did fcowle on Richard: no man cride, God faue him:...
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The Time is Out of Joint: Shakespeare as Philosopher of History

Agnes Heller - Fiction - 2002 - 375 pages
...center of the historical theater was his present lord, Henry, the man who did not play. So he speaks: "As in a theatre the eyes of men, / After a well-graced...contempt, men's eyes / Did scowl on gentle Richard. No man cried 'God save him!' (5.2.23-28). Richard's words sounded to the audience in York's recollection...
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William Shakespeare: The Complete Works

William Shakespeare - Literary Collections - 1989 - 1280 pages
...doing, thus he past along. DUCHESS OF YORK. Alack, poor Richard! where rode he the whilst? DUKE OF YORK. [t {ŀ no man cried, 'God save him!' No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home: But dust was thrown upon...
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Restoration Literature: An Anthology

Paul Hammond - Literary Collections - 2002 - 437 pages
...consider the wretchedness of his condition, and his carriage in it; and refrain from pity if you can: As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced...or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on R1chard: no man cried, 'God save him': No joyful tongue gave him his welcome home, But dust was thrown...
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The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare's History Plays

Cambridge University Press - Drama - 2002 - 283 pages
...words as he turns from his report of the happy reception of Bullingbrook to the appearance of Richard: 'As in a theatre the eyes of men /After a well-graced...enters next, /Thinking his prattle to be tedious' (5.2.23-6). For Dekker the City as actor must abandon its role, made possible by the presence of the...
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The Wisdom of Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - Political Science - 2002 - 228 pages
...taste, sans everything. Jacques — AYLI lI.vii In a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-grac'd actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious. York — Richard II V.ii O for a Muse of fire, that would ascend The brightest heaven of invention,...
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