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" Multiply each payment by its term of credit, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments ; the quotient will be the average term of credit. "
The Youth's Assistant in Theoretic and Practical Arithmetic: Designed for ... - Page 82
by Zadock Thompson - 1838 - 164 pages
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Engineers' and Mechanics' Pocket-book ...

Charles Haynes Haswell - Engineering - 1844 - 264 pages
...11.34-5-7.56= 1.5 years, Ans. EQUATION OF PAYMENTS. Multiply ench sum by its time of payment in days, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments. EXAMPLE.— A owes B $300 in 15 days, $60 in 12 days, and $350 in 20 days ; when is the whole...
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Mechanics for Practical Men

Alexander Jamieson - Mechanics - 1845 - 238 pages
...the magnitude or density of each body, by its respective distance from the beginning of the system, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the bodies for the distance of the centre of gravity sought The following examples will suffice for the...
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Practical System of Book-keeping by Double & Single Entry

Benjamin Wood Foster - Bookkeeping - 1845 - 150 pages
...debts, due at different periods of time. RULE. Multiply each amount by the time in which it is payable, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the debts ; the quotient will be the equated time of payment EXAMPLES. 1. Bought of Silas Pierce & Co....
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The University Arithmetic: Embracing the Science of Numbers, and Their ...

Charles Davies - Arithmetic - 1846 - 399 pages
...due, equal to ? Hence, to find the mean time, Multiply each payment by the time before it becomes due, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments : the quotient will be the mean time. EXAMPLES. 1 . B owes A $600 : $200 is to be paid in...
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Text-book of arithmetic, for the use of teachers

John Hunter (of Uxbridge.) - 1847
...terms, as follows:— Multiply the given debts by their respective times, expressed in one denomination, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the debts. The two last Exercises will, to those who are acquainted with algebra, afford opportunity of...
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The United States Arithmetic: Designed for Academies and Schools

William Vogdes - Arithmetic - 1847 - 256 pages
...given, to find the value of the mixture. PULE. Multiply each quantity of the mixture by its rate, then divide the sum of the products by the sum of the quantities, and the quotient will give the rate of the mixture required ? EXAMPLES. 1. If 19 bushels of rye, at...
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Arithmetic: Designed for Academies and Schools, Uniting the Inductive ...

Charles Davies - Arithmetic - 1847 - 360 pages
...payments.) Hence, to find the mean time, ' .• , ' Multiply each payment by ihe time before it becomes due, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the payments : the quotient will be the mean time. EXAMPLES. .'•, 1. B owes A $600 : $200 is to be paid...
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The Rational Arithmetic: In which the Science is Fully Developed, the Art ...

James S. Russell - Arithmetic - 1847 - 330 pages
...or days, as is most convenient, between the time of the calculation) and the maturity of the debt, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the debts; the quotient will show the number of years, months, or days, to elapse before the single payment...
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The American Arithmetic

James Robinson (of Boston.) - 1847
...Multiply each debt by the number of days, months, or years, between its date and the time it becomes due, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the debts; the quotient will be the average or mean time for the payment of the sum of 'all the debts....
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Journal of the Chemical Society, Volume 64, Part 2

Chemical Society (Great Britain) - Chemistry - 1893
...combination of the acid and base. Multiply A into the equivalent weight of the acid, B into that of the base, and divide the sum of the products by the sum of the equivalents : call the quotient D. Subtract G from I) and multiply by 100/D. The percentuge loss or...
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