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Books Books 81 - 90 of 182 on The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle that we tread upon,....
" The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare - Page 354
by William Shakespeare - 1839
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, Adapted for Family Reading

William Shakespeare, Thomas Bowdler - 1861 - 864 pages
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life should'st entertain, And eix or seven winters more respect terly done : The very life seems warm upon her lip....are mock'd with art. Paul. I '11 draw the curtain Claud. Why give you me this shame If I must die, I will encounter darkness as a bride, And hug it...
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Chamber's household edition of the dramatic works of William Shakespeare, ed ...

William Shakespeare - 1861
...Would bark your honour from that trunk you bear, And leave you naked, Claud. Let me know the point. Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The sense...corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies.6 Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness...
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Choice thoughts from Shakspere, by the author of 'The book of familiar ...

William Shakespeare - 1861
...feverous life shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Darest thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. The Fear of Death, Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot...
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Companion to English grammar

Jacob Lowres - 1862
...the view of an excellent production is to undervalue it) will never have one of his own to show. 8. The sense of death is most in apprehension; and the...sufferance finds a pang as great, (as when a giant dies). 9. A diamond (though set in horn) is still a diamond, and sparkles as in purest gold. 1 0. I can get...
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On the Received Text of Shakespeare's Dramatic Writings and Its Improvements

Samuel Bailey - 1862 - 266 pages
...language is literally construed. Of this there is a striking instance in the wellknown lines, — " The sense of death is most in apprehension; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies." Measure for Measure, act iii. sc. 1. Where the literal construction is that when the poor beetle is...
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An index to familiar quotations selected principally from British authors ...

John Cooper Grocott - 1863
...should we, in our peevish opposition, Take it to heart ? SHAESPERE. — Ibid. (The King to Hamlet.) The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. SnARSi'ERE. — Measure for Measure, Act III. Scene 1. (Isabella to her brother.) The weariest and...
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Literary Characteristics and Achievements of the Bible

W. Trail - Bible - 1863 - 368 pages
...friends The man who, needlessly, sets foots upon a worm." Or these lines by a still greater poet— " The sense of death is most in apprehension; And the...sufferance finds a pang As great as when a giant dies." But how exquisitely more touching are some similar passages in Scripture! As this, for example, where...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: The Plays Ed. from the Folio of ..., Volume 3

Richard Grant White - 1863
...st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect, Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The_ sense of death is most in apprehension And the poor...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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The plays of William Shakespeare, ed. by T. Keightley, Volume 2

Thomas Keightley - 1864
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The sense...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I cannot22 resolution fetch From flowery tenderness?...
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Cassell's illustrated Shakespeare. The plays of Shakespeare, ed ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1864
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life shouldst entertain," And six or seven winters more respect e for me ? Bertram. Yes, my good lord , But never...III. Hel. The honour, sir, that flames in your fair Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ?" If...
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