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" The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare - Page 354
by William Shakespeare - 1839
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Laconics: or, The best words of the best authors

John Timbs - Reference - 1856
...living, and they make me live. — Sir Godfrey Kneller — i« defence of Portrait-painting: MCLXX. The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Shakspeare. MCLXXL To resist temptation once is not a sufficient proof o' honesty. If a servant, indeed,...
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A Collection of Familiar Quotations: With Complete Indices of Authors and ...

John Bartlett - Quotations - 1856 - 358 pages
...miserable have no other medicine, But only hope. Measure for Measure — Continued. Act iii. Sc. 1. The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Act iii. Sc. 1. Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot....
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Shakspearian Reader: A Collection of the Most Approved Plays of Shakspeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1857 - 469 pages
...a feverish life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Dar'st thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great, As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame t Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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The Complete Works of Shakspeare, Revised from the Best ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1857
...a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Dar'st thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame '( Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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The Plays & Poems of Shakespeare: Merry wives of Windsor. Measure for ...

William Shakespeare, Edmond Malone - 1857
...feverous life shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Darest thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. 1 Preparation. * Extent. * To one painful idea, ie to ignominy. * Strip. Clau. Why give you me this...
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Shakspere's Werke, herausg. und erklärt von N. Delius. [With] Nachträge und ...

William Shakespeare - 1859
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die? The sense...sufferance finds a pang, as great As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness? 20...
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Lectures on the Dramatic Literature of the Age of Elizabeth

William Hazlitt - English drama - 1859 - 229 pages
...a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Dar'st thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. CLAUDIO. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ;...
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Tales from Shakspere: For the Use of Young Persons

Charles Lamb, Charles Knight - 1859 - 503 pages
...entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The seuse of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle,...sufferance finds a pang as great, As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame P Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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Pearls of Shakespeare: A Collection of the Most Brillant Passages Found in ...

William Shakespeare - 1860 - 160 pages
...feverous life shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Darest thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. REFLECTIONS ON THE VANITY OF LIFE. Reason thus with life, — If I do lose thee, I do lose a thing,...
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Pearls of Shakspeare, a collection of the most brilliant passages found in ...

William Shakespeare - 1860
...feverous life shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Darest thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension;...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. REFLECTIONS ON THE VANITY OF LIFE. Reason thus with life,— If I do lose thee, I do lose a thing,...
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