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" The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare - Page 354
by William Shakespeare - 1839
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1852
...Leprous eruptions. (3) Old age. (4) Resident. (5) Preparation. (6) Vattness of extent (7) Shut up. The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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The family Shakespeare [expurgated by T. Bowdler]. in which those words are ...

William Shakespeare - 1853
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die? The sense...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Claudio. Why give you me this shame? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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The Plays of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Old Copies, and by the ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 884 pages
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life would'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect, en desire : — that many may be meant By the fool...Which prize not th' interior, but, like the martlet, Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can в resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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The Works of Shakespeare: The Text Regulated by the Recently ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare, John Payne Collier - 1853
...: and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life would'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect, Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The sense...sufferance finds a pang, as great As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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The Poetry of the Sentiments

Rufus Wilmot Griswold - English poetry - 1853 - 320 pages
...shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die f The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If I must...
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The miscellaneous works, Volume 2

William Hazlitt - Literary Criticism - 1854
...entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Dar'st thou die ? . , The seme of death is most in apprehension ; , / And the poor...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. CLAUDIO. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ;...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Comprising His Plays and Poems ...

William Shakespeare - 1855 - 986 pages
...would'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect, Than a perpetual honor. Dar'st thou <lio ? s great lost That would not bless our Europe with your daughter, But rather lose her to an African Claud. Why give you me this shame 1 Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness 7 If...
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Palæstra musarum; or, Materials for translation into Greek verse, selected ...

Benjamin Hall Kennedy - 1856
...Claudio ; and I quake Lest thou a feverish life should'st entertain And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The sense...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. C. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowing tenderness ? If I must...
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Great Truths by great Authors

1856
...earth, and hiss at human pride, The wisdom of the wise, and prancings of the great. ), — Shakspeare. T'HE sense of Death is most in apprehension ; And...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. 2B£fttf), — Shakspeare. HERE lurks no treason, here no envy swells, Here grow no damned grudges...
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Laconics: Or the Best Words of the Best Authors ...

John Timbs - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1856
...living, and they make me live. — Sir Godfrey Kneller — in defence of Portrait-painting. MCLXX. The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Shakspeare. MCLXXI. To resist temptation once is not a sufficient proof o' uonesty. ]fa servant, indeed,...
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