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" The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare - Page 354
by William Shakespeare - 1839
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The works of William Shakespeare, the text formed from an entirely ..., Volume 2

John Payne Collier - 1842
...trough all," &c. Lest thou a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect, Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The sense...sufferance finds a pang, as great As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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The works of Shakspere, revised from the best authorities: with a ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1843
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The sense...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. ClaiuL Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness? If...
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Characters of Shakespeare's Plays

William Hazlitt - 1845 - 229 pages
...feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Dar'at thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. CLAUDIO. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ;...
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The Book of Symbols: A Series of Seventy-five Short Essays on Morals ...

Robert Mushet - Ethics, Ancient - 1847 - 506 pages
...dread of death is most in apprehension ; that the pain is no more to him than to the meanest insect. " The sense of death is most in apprehension, And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies." 7. That must be a poor spirit, indeed, who can prefer the fleeting pleasures of this life to the beatitude...
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Life. New facts regarding the life of Shakespeare [by P. J. Collier ...

William Shakespeare - 1848
...a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Dar'st thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies.5 1 A leiger is a resident. 3 ie preparation. 3 ie vastnees of extent. 4 "To a determined scope"...
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The Dramatic Works of W. Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1849 - 925 pages
...shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Dar'et thou die 1 hakespeare Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From fiowery tenderness ? If...
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Studies of Shakspere: Forming a Companion Volume to Every Edition of the Text

Charles Knight - 1849 - 560 pages
...— like an angry ape. Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven, As make the angels weep." " The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies." We select these, contrary to our usual practice of not separating the parts from the whole, for the...
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The literary class book; or, Readings in English literature

Robert Joseph Sullivan - 1850
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die? The sense...sufferance finds a pang as great, As when a giant dies. Claud — Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction, and to rot: This sensible...
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The dramatic (poetical) works of William Shakspeare; illustr., embracing a ...

William Shakespeare - 1850
...a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Dar'st thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies.5 1 A liiirer is a resident a L e. preparation. 3 ie vast ness of extent 4 "To a determined scope"...
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THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKSPEARE

1850
...a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor« Dar'st thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies.5 1 A leiger is a resident 2 ie preparation. 3 ie vastness of extent. 4 " To a determined scope...
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