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" The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. "
The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare - Page 354
by William Shakespeare - 1839
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text by G. Steevens and E ...

William Shakespeare - 1826
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous lite should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honour. Dar'st thou die ? The sense...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Claud. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness ? If...
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Volume 2

John Timbs - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1829
...living, and they make me live.— *> Godfrey Kneller— in defenee of Portrait-painting. •MCLXX. The sense of death is most in apprehension; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Shdktpeare. MCLXXI. To resist temptation-once is not a sufficient proof of honesty. If a servant, indeed,...
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Laconics; or, The best words of the best authors [ed. by J. Timbs]. 1st Amer. ed

Laconics - 1829
...the living, and they make me live.—Sir Godfrey Kneller— in defenee of Portrait-painting. MCLXX. The sense of death is most in apprehension; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Shatepeare. MCLXXI. To resist temptation once is not a sufficient proof of . honesty. If a servant,...
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The plays and poems of Shakspeare [according to the text of E. Malone] with ...

William Shakespeare - 1832
...feverous life shouldst entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honor. Darest thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Preparation. ! Extent. Clau. Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery...
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Characteristics of women, moral, poetical and historical, Volume 1

Anna Brownell Jameson - 1832
...my brother's life. Let me he ignorant, and in nothing good, But graciously to know I am no hetter. The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great, As when a giant dies ! "Pis not impossible But one, the wicked'st caitiff on the ground May seem as shy, as grave, as just,...
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The Plays and Poems of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ...

William Shakespeare - 1833 - 1064 pages
...Claudio; and I quake, Lest thou a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect dress y 2 90 ACT III. 91 Claud. Why give you me this shame? Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness?...
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Complete Works: With Dr. Johnson's Preface, a Glossary, and an Account of ...

William Shakespeare - 1838 - 926 pages
...; and I quake, Lest thou a feverish life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect inted for Scott, Webster and Geary"- Shakespeare William" William Shakespeare( Claud. Why give you me this shame '! Think you I can a resolution fetch From flowery tenderness '111...
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Cheveley: Or, The Man of Honour, Volume 2

Baroness Rosina Bulwer Lytton Lytton - 1839
...jest, you at once endanger a man's health, understanding, honour, patriotism, and morals." CHAPTER V. " Why give you me this shame ? Think you I can a resolution...will encounter darkness as a bride, And hug it in my arms." SHAKSPEARE. / " Love is a superstition that doth fear ' . \ The idol which itself hath...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare: Life. New facts regarding the life ...

William Shakespeare - 1839
...thou a feverous life should'st entertain, And six or seven winters more respect Than a perpetual honon Dar'st thou die ? The sense of death is most in apprehension...sufferance finds a pang as great / As when a giant dies.5 1 A leiger is a resident a ie preparation. 3 ie vastness of extent 4 To a determined scope...
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The Philosophy of Shakspere: Extracted from His Plays

William Shakespeare, Michael Henry Rankin - 1841 - 238 pages
...happiness. See Captain Frauklyn'x Expedition in the arctic region.. SPEAKING PHYSICALLY. Isabella. The sense of death is most in apprehension; And the...sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies. Measure for Measure. Act iii. Scene 1. THE FRIEND OF MISERY—AND TERROR OF PROSPERITY. Constance....
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