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" I think a little change has taken place in my intellect lately — I cannot bear to be uninterested or unemployed, I, who for so long a time have been addicted to passiveness. "
Life, letters, and literary remains, of John Keats - Page 98
by Richard Monckton Milnes (1st baron Houghton.) - 1848
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The Complete Poetical Works of Keats

John Keats - English poetry - 1899 - 473 pages
...bear to be uninterested or unemployed, I, who for so long a time have been addicted to paseiveness. Nothing is finer for the purposes of great productions...intellectual powers. As an instance of this — observe — I eat down yesterday to read King Lear once again : the thing appeared to demand the prologue of a sonnet,...
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Marlowe: A Critical Study

J. B. Steane, J. B.. Steane, Steane J B - Literary Criticism - 1964 - 381 pages
...unstable poet it seems to make for an interesting condition, rarely for a completely happy achievement. 'Nothing is finer for the purposes of great productions...very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers', wrote Keats.1 In Shakespeare one sees just such a process; so that in the Henry VI plays, for instance,...
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The Other Poetry of Keats

Gerald B. Kauvar - Literary Criticism - 1969 - 238 pages
...George and Tom, 23 January 1818: "I think a little change has taken place in my intellect lately-I cannot bear to be uninterested or unemployed, I, who for so long a time, have been adicted to passiveness— nothing is finer for the purposes of great productions than a very gradual...
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The Small Room: A Novel

May Sarton - Fiction - 1976 - 249 pages
..."ripeness" or of "ripening," first an early one written in 1818: "Nothing is finer for the purpose of great productions than a very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers." (The last phrase, pointed up by Ilallie in an ironic reference to themselves, caused a ripple of amusement....
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John Keats

Walter Jackson Bate - Biography & Autobiography - 2009 - 780 pages
...he thought, for "a very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers"; and all he can say now is that "I think a little change has taken place in my intellect lately." Then he turns to the sonnet, copies it out for George and Tom, and adds: "So you see I am getting at...
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John Keats

John Barnard, Barnard John - Literary Collections - 1987 - 172 pages
...1818, Keats knew that, his speculations would take him far beyond the bounds of his pastoral romance - 'I think a little change has taken place in my intellect lately' (Letters, i. 214). Although that 'little change' had mapped out an alternative to Coleridgean introspection...
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Majestic Indolence: English Romantic Poetry and the Work of Art

Willard Spiegelman - Literary Criticism - 1995 - 240 pages
...his brother and sister-inlaw right before printing "On Sitting Down to Read King Lear Once Again": "[A] little change has taken place in my intellect...very gradual ripening of the intellectual powers" (Letters, 1 :214). At the end of his great creative period (September 22, 1819), however, he writes...
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John Keats and the Loss of Romantic Innocence

Keith D. White - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 194 pages
...after his first encounter with it, although a letter to Bailey offers perhaps the best explanation: Nothing is finer for the purposes of great productions,...intellectual powers As an instance of this — observe — 1 sat down to read King Lear once again the thing appeared to demand the prologue of a sonnet....
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Keats

Andrew Motion - Biography & Autobiography - 1999 - 636 pages
...and a new version of the 'deep eternal theme'. Shortly after completing them, he told his brothers: 'I think a little change has taken place in my intellect...long a time, have been a[d]dicted to passiveness.' Keats was loath to admit it, but his sense of recommitment had something to do with his recent visit...
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Shakespeare and the Editorial Tradition

Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Humanities Stephen Orgel, Stephen Orgel, Sean Keilen - Literary Criticism - 1999 - 418 pages
...the Land" — You shall hear whriher it will be Quarto or non Quarto, picture or non Picture. . . . I think a little change has taken place in my intellect lately — l cannot bear to be oninterested or onemployed, I, who for so long a time, liave been addicted...
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