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" Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the state. "
The Black Book: Or, Corruption Unmasked! - Page 384
by John Wade - 1820
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The National Quarterly Review, Volumes 33-34

Periodicals - 1876
...manner, in which it is most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it, &c" Fourth. — Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take...and above what it brings into the public treasury ot the State," &c. \ On the subject of rent he was equally just and comprehensive. \ In agriculture...
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An article, practical and theoretical, on taxation. Written for ..., Volume 82

John Ramsay M'Culloch - 1860
...must be his own fault if be ever suffers any considerable inconveniency from such taxes." Fourth. " Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into...
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On Taxation: How it is Raised and how it is Expended

Leone Levi - Finance, Public - 1860 - 255 pages
...greater ease and more extended co-operation. Indirect taxes are said to be opposed to the principle that every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above what it brings into the...
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THE NEW AMERICAN CYCLOPAEDIA; A POPULAR DICTIONARY OF GENERAL KNOWLEDGE

GEORGE RIPLEY - 1862
...time, and in the manner, in which it is most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it. 4. Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take...it brings into the public treasury of the state." The taxes of most of the nations of Europe prior to the present century were so levied as to violate...
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The new American cyclopędia, ed. by G. Ripley and C.A. Dana, Volume 15

American cyclopaedia - 1862
...the manner, in which it is most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it. 4. Every tas ought to be so contrived as both to take out and keep...it brings into the ' public treasury of the state." The taxes of most of the nations of Europe prior to the present century were so levied as to violate...
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The People's Blue Book: Taxation as it Is, and as it Ought to be ...

Charles Tennant - England - 1862 - 706 pages
...time, or in the manner, in which it is most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it. 4. Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into...
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A Treatise on the Principles and Practical Influence of Taxation and the ...

John Ramsay McCulloch - Debts, Public - 1863 - 524 pages
...must be his own fault if he ever suffers any considerable iuconveniency from such taxes. Fourth. — " Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above what it brings into the...
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Report of proceedings at the seventh annual congress

National association for the promotion of social science - 1863
...shirked or repudiated by any honest man any more than any other debt. (2.) That taxation should take and keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible beyond what it yields to the public exchequer. (3.) That the public revenue should be raised from the...
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Utilitarianism Explained and Exemplified in Moral and Political Government

Charles Tennant - Utilitarianism - 1864 - 463 pages
...temptation to commit the crime." Nearly a century ago, Adam Smith laid. it down as an admitted axiom that, " Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take...as possible over and above what it brings into the Treasury of the State." Now, the effect of our system is, to reduce the purchasing power of the Wages...
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Hansard's Parliamentary Debates

Great Britain. Parliament - Great Britain - 1864
...revenue which he enjoyed under its protection, and that every tax ought to be so contrived as to take out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above the amount which it brought into the national treasury. As Mr. Stuart Mill said, those were the orthodox...
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