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" Republicans. It is exceedingly desirable that all parts of this great confederacy shall be at peace, and in harmony, one with another. Let us Republicans do our part to have it so. Even though much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper.... "
The Martyr's Monument: Being the Patriotism and Political Wisdom of Abraham ... - Page 8
by Abraham Lincoln - 1885 - 297 pages
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Orations from Homer to William McKinley, Volume 16

Mayo Williamson Hazeltine - Speeches, addresses, etc - 1902
...threat of destruction to the Union to extort my vote, can scarcely be distinguished in principle. / A few words now to Republicans. It is exceedingly...be at peace and in harmony one with another. Let us Eepublicans do our part to have it so. Even though much provoked, let us do nothing through passion...
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Letters and Addresses of Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln - United States - 1903 - 399 pages
...threat of destruction to the Union, to extort my vote, can scarcely be distinguished in principle. A few words now to Republicans. It is exceedingly...much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper. Even though the Southern people will not so much as listen to us, let us calmly consider...
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Letters and Addresses of Abraham Lincoln ...

Abraham Lincoln - United States - 1903 - 399 pages
...threat of destruction to the Union, to extort my vote, can scarcely be distinguished in principle. A few words now to Republicans. It is exceedingly...much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper. Even though the Southern people will not so much as listen to us, let us calmly consider...
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The Republican Party: A History of Its Fifty Years' Existence and ..., Volume 1

Francis Curtis - United States - 1904
...everywhere in parcels; but there neither are, nor can be supplied, the indispensable connecting trains. A few words now to Republicans. It is exceedingly...much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper. Even though the Southern people will not so much as listen to us, let us calmly consider...
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The Lincoln and Douglas Debates: In the Senatorial Campaign of 1858 in ...

Abraham Lincoln - Lincoln-Douglas Debates, Ill., 1858 - 1905 - 297 pages
...scarcely be distinI guished in principle. p-"^ few words now to Republicans. It is exceed- 10 / ingly desirable that all parts of this great Confederacy...much provoked, let us do nothing through' passion and ill temper. Even though 15 the Southern people will not so much as listen to us, let us calmly consider...
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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 5

Abraham Lincoln - Lincoln-Douglas Debates, Ill., 1858 - 1906
...threat of destruction to the Union, to extort my vote, can scarcely be distinguished in principle. A few words now to Republicans: It is exceedingly...much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper. Even though the Southern people will not so much as listen to us, let us calmly consider...
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Speeches of Abraham Lincoln: Including Inaugurals and Proclamations

Abraham Lincoln - 1906 - 417 pages
...to the Union, to extort my vote, can scarcely be distinguished in principle. A few words now to the Republicans. It is exceedingly desirable that all...much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper. Even though the Southern people will not so much as listen to us, let us calmly consider...
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The History of North America, Volume 15

Guy Carleton Lee, Francis Newton Thorpe - Indians of North America - 1906
...mutters through his teeth, 'Stand and deliver, or I shall kill you, and then you will be a murderer.' "It is exceedingly desirable that all parts of this...shall be at peace, and in harmony, one with another. "Will (the Southern people) be satisfied if the Territories be unconditionally surrendered to them?...
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The Civil War: The National View

Francis Newton Thorpe - United States - 1906 - 535 pages
...mutters through his teeth, 'Stand and deliver, or I shall kill you, and then you will be a murderer.' "It is exceedingly desirable that all parts of this...shall be at peace, and in harmony, one with another. "Will (the Southern people) be satisfied if the Territories be unconditionally surrendered to them?...
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Letters and telegrams

Abraham Lincoln - Presidents - 1907
...threat of destruction to the Union, to extort my vote, can scarcely be distinguished in principle. A few words now to Republicans. It is exceedingly...much provoked, let us do nothing through passion and ill temper. Even though the Southern people will not so much as listen to us, let us calmly consider...
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