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Books Books 81 - 86 of 86 on And, seeing there was no place to mount up higher, Why should I grieve at my declining....
" And, seeing there was no place to mount up higher, Why should I grieve at my declining fall? Farewell, fair queen; weep not for Mortimer, That scorns the world, and, as a traveller, Goes to discover countries yet unknown. "
The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany - Page 148
1821
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Brecht and Company: Sex, Politics, and the Making of the Modern Drama

John Fuegi - Biography & Autobiography - 2002 - 732 pages
...means. In Marlowe, Young Mortimer contemplates his end as follows: Base Fortune, now I see, that in the wheel There is a point, to which when men aspire, They tumble headlong down: that point I touched, And, seeing there was no place to mount up higher, Why should I grieve at my declining fall....
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The Intelligencer

Leslie Silbert - Fiction - 2004 - 352 pages
...by the straight, crowlike movement where there was no direct road, he knew she was in a chopper. 32 Base Fortune, now I see, that in thy wheel There is...mount up higher, Why should I grieve at my declining fall? Farewell, fair Queen, weep not for Mortimer, That scorns the world, and as a traveler Goes to...
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The English History Play in the Age of Shakespeare

Irving Ribner - Literary Criticism - 1965 - 356 pages
...1 See R. Frickcr, 'The Dramatic Structure of Edward II,' English Stiulics, XXXIV (1953), 204-I7Base Fortune, now I see that in thy wheel There is a point, to which when men aspire, They nimble headlong down, That point I muchcdj And, seeing there was no place to mount up higher, Why should...
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Performing Early Modern Trauma from Shakespeare to Milton

Thomas Page Anderson - Literary Criticism - 2006 - 225 pages
...Mortimer translates the language of his first allegory into the common metaphor of Fortune's Wheel: "now I see, that in thy wheel / There is a point, to which men aspire, / They tumble headlong down: that point I touch'd" (5.6.59-61). The language of allegory...
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Shakespeare

Russell A. Fraser - 1988
...temptation and all that is merely formal. The hero-villain in his greatest play waxes, then wanes: Base Fortune, now I see that in thy wheel There is...which, when men aspire, They tumble headlong down. In Henry VIII Shakespeare returns to this involuntary sequence, aloof from wishing and willing like...
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Renaissance Drama

Sandra Clark - History - 2007 - 224 pages
...wheele There is a point, to which when men aspire, They tumble hedlong downe, that point I touchte And seeing there was no place to mount up higher, Why should I greeve at my declining fall? (sc. 23.59-63) But the earlier part of Edward II takes a more secular...
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