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" OF man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly Muse... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 132
1852
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The Elements of Anglo-Saxon Grammar: With Copious Notes Illustrating the ...

Joseph Bosworth - Alphabet - 1823 - 332 pages
...and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden ; till one greater man Restore...regain the blissful seat— Sing, heavenly muse—" &c. In the two following examples, the words immediately derived from the Saxon are still more numerous:—...
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The British Essayists: Spectator

James Ferguson - English essays - 1823
...disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heav'nly muse ! These lines are perhaps, as plain, simple, and unadorned, as any of the whole poem,...
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The London Magazine, Volume 7

1823
...mortal taste Brought death int.. the world, and all our woe, With Ions of Eden, till one greater man 'Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing heavenly muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, 8r of Sinai, &c. Again, to affirm that " a strong accent is in all cases indispensably...
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Paradise lost, a poem

John Milton - 1823
...mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till{one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly Muse, that on the secret top Ot-p/ebi, 9& of Sinai, didst inspire 'Toat shepherd, who first taught the chosen seed, In...
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The Works of Alexander Popekesq., with Notes and Illustrations by ..., Volume 8

Alexander Pope - 1824
...and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater man Restore...and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly muse. " In these, and the lines which immediately follow, the pauses are shifted through all the ten syllables....
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The Works of Alexander Pope: Esq. with Notes and Illustrations by ..., Volume 8

Alexander Pope, William Roscoe - English literature - 1824
...and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater man Restore...and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly muse. " In these, and the lines which immediately follow, the pauses are shifted through all the ten syllables....
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Select British Poets, Or, New Elegant Extracts from Chaucer to the Present ...

William Hazlitt - English poetry - 1824 - 822 pages
...disobedience, and the fruit Ofthat forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our ye Has lost the chasers, and his ear the cry ; Exulting, till he finds their nobler sense T heav'uly Muse, that on the secret top Of Oreb, or of Sinai, didst inspire That shepherd, who first...
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The Young Gentleman and Lady's Monitor, and English Teacher's Assistant ...

Readers - 1824 - 323 pages
...and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater man Restore us and regain the blissful seat, Sing heav'nly muse ! that on the sacred top OfOreb, orofSini, did'st inspire That shepherd who first taught...
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The Poetical Works of John Milton: With Notes of Various Authors ..., Volume 1

John Milton - 1824
...the fruit Of that forbidden tree, | whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, | and all our woe, With loss of Eden, | till one greater Man Restore us, | and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heav'nly Muse. | Mr. Pope, in a letter to Mr. Walsh containing some critical observations on English...
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A general critical grammar of the Inglish language, on a system novel and ...

Samuel Oliver (jun.) - 1825
...disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste Brought death into the world and, all our woe With loss of Eden, till one greater man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heav'nly muse!- • 248 as in blank-verse ; for though in this species of poetry it is more difficult...
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