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" With wanton heed and giddy cunning ; The melting voice through mazes running, Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony ; That Orpheus... "
Discoveries in hieroglyphics, and other antiquities, in progress to which ... - Page 234
by Robert Deverell - 1813
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The Poetical Works of John Milton: A New Edition Carefully Revised from the ...

John Milton - 1855 - 570 pages
...that tie That Orpheus' self may heave his head From golden slumber on a bed Of heaped Elysian flowers, and hear Such strains as would have won the ear Of Pluto, to have quite set free His half regained Eurydice. These delights, if thou canst give, Mirth, with thee I mean to live. 3 XIV....
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Reading lessons, ed. by E. Hughes, Book 2

Edward Hughes - 1855
...harmony ; That Orpheus' self may heave his head From golden slumber on a bed Of heap'd Elysian flowers, and hear Such strains as would have won the ear Of Pluto, to have quite set free His half-rcgain'd Eurydice." 14. Our sense of hearing is not exposed to many deceptions, unless when our...
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The Complete Poetical Works of John Milton: With Life

John Milton - Bookbinding - 1855 - 491 pages
...harmony ; That Orpheus' self may heave his head From golden slumber on a bed Of heaped Elysian flowers, and hear Such strains as would have won the ear Of Pluto, to have quite set free His half regained Eurydice. These delights if thou canst give, Mirth, with thes I mean to live. lL PENSEROSO....
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Marxism, Science, and the Movement of History

Alan R. Burger, Hyman R. Cohen, David H. DeGrood - Communism - 1980 - 298 pages
...Upon the sightless couriers of the air ..." and where I now read with tears, having heard much music, Such strains as would have won the ear Of Pluto, to have quite set free His half-regained Eurydice. You had to know what was in the lines: that was Spier's message. And when you...
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Milton, Poet of Exile

Louis Lohr Martz - Poetry - 1986 - 356 pages
...self may heave his head From golden slumber on a bed Of heapt Elysian flowres, and hear Such streins as would have won the ear Of Pluto, to have quite set free His half-regain'd Eurydice. [145-50] All this presents a sharp contrast with the poem of "the fixed mind" whose presiding goddess,...
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Melodious Guile: Fictive Pattern in Poetic Language

John Hollander - Poetry - 1990 - 262 pages
...parallel evocation of Orpheus in the closing lines of VAllegro calls up music and lyric poetry to make one hear Such strains as would have won the ear Of Pluto, to have quite set free His half-regained Eurydice. We are reminded that the formulation in // Penseroso suppresses the fact that...
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The Cambridge Companion to English Poetry, Donne to Marvell

Thomas N. Corns, Senior Lecturer Department of English Thomas N Corns, University of Cambridge - Literary Criticism - 1993 - 306 pages
...Untwisting all the chains that tie The hidden soul of harmony; That Orpheus' self may heave his head From golden slumber on a bed Of heapt Elysian flow'rs,...thou canst give, Mirth, with thee I mean to live. (lines 143-51) 'These delights' have by the poem's end become quite clearly defined as the delights...
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Squitter-wits and Muse-haters: Sidney, Spenser, Milton, and Renaissance ...

Peter C. Herman - Literary Criticism - 1996 - 284 pages
...That Orpheus' self may heave his head From golden slumber on a bed Of heapt Elysian flow'rs, and heat Such strains as would have won the ear Of Pluto, to have quite set free His half-regain'd Eurydice. (11. 136-50) the charges of the Muse-haters that it is precisely the "linked sweetness" of poetry that...
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Classical Mythology in English Literature: A Critical Anthology

Geoffrey Miles - Literary Collections - 1999 - 456 pages
...harmony; 145 That Orpheus' self may heave his head From golden slumber on a bed Of heaped Elysian flowers, and hear Such strains as would have won the ear Of Pluto, to have quite set free 150 His half-regained Eurydice. These delights if thou canst give, Mirth, with thee I mean to live....
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The Origins of English Words: A Discursive Dictionary of Indo-European Roots

Joseph Twadell Shipley - Language Arts & Disciplines - 2001 - 672 pages
...ends: That Orpheus self may heave his head From golden slumber on a bed Of heaped Elysian flowers, and hear Such strains as would have won the ear Of Pluto to have quite set free His half-regained Eurydice. These delights if thou canst give, Mirth, with thee I mean to live. Henry King,...
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