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" ... twere, the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her own feature, scorn her own image, and the very age and body of the time his form and pressure. "
The Plays of Shakspeare: Printed from the Text of Samuel Johnson, George ... - Page 264
by William Shakespeare - 1807
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The Standard Speaker: Containing Exercises in Prose and Poetry for ...

Epes Sargent - Elocution - 1852 - 558 pages
...would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant ; it out-Herods Herod. Pray you avoid it. Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, — whose end, both at the first and now, was...
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The Standard Speaker: Containing Exercises in Prose and Poetry for ...

Epes Sargent - Readers - 1852 - 558 pages
...would have such a fellow whipped for o'erdoing Termagant ; it out-Herods Herod. Pray you avoid it. Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, — whose end, both at the first and now, was...
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William Shakspeare's Complete Works, Dramatic and Poetic, Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1852
...honour. Ham. Be not too tame neither, but let TOUT on discretion be your tutor : suit the action to tbe ten thousand ducata pnrpne of playing, whose end, both at first, and now, waa, and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 345 pages
...out-herods Herod.§ Pray you, avoid it. Play. I warrant your honour. Ham. Be not too tame neither, bullet your own discretion be your tutor: suit the action...overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and is, to hold, as 'twere the mirror up to nature; to show virtue her...
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The plays of Shakspere, carefully revised [by J.O.] with ..., Part 166, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1853
...have such a fellow whipped for o'er-doing Termagant ; it out-herods Herod : pray you, avoid it. 1ģi Play. I warrant your honour. Ham. Be not too tame...that you o'er-step not the modesty of nature : for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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The Book of Eloquence: A Collection of Extracts in Prose and Verse, from the ...

Readers - 1853 - 452 pages
...would have such a fellow whipped for o'er-doing Termagant ; it out-herods Herod : Pray you, avoid it. Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...that you o'er-step not the modesty of nature : for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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School elocution : or The young academical orator

William Herbert - 1853 - 192 pages
...would have such a fellow whipp'd for o'er doing Termagant ; it out-herod's Herod : Pray you, avoid it. Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both first and now, was, and is, to...
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The Wisdom and Genius of Shakespeare: Comprising Moral Philosophy ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 575 pages
...whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness. .... Be not too tame neither, but let your own discretion...observance, that you o'er-step not the modesty of nature. 36— iii. 2. 187. Studies to be pursued according to taste and pleasure. Continue your resolve, To...
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Dictionary of Shakespearian Quotations: Exhibiting the Most Forcible ...

William Shakespeare - 1853 - 418 pages
...MW iv. 4. ACTION, DRAMATIC. Let your own discretion be your tutor : suit the action to the word, and the word to the action; with this special observance,...overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and is, to hold, as 'twere, the mirror up to nature ; to show virtue her...
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Stratford as Connected with Shakespeare: And the Bard's Rural Haunts

Edwin Lees - Dramatists, English - 1854 - 66 pages
...the drama, an extract D from his own lecture on the subject in Hamlet fully shows : — " Let your discretion be your tutor, suit the action to the word,...that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature ; for anything so overdone is from the purpose of playing, whose end, both at the first, and now, was, and...
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