Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the column, or the arch to bend, To swell the terrace, or to sink the grot; In all, let Nature never be forgot. "
An Essay on the Genius and Writings of Pope ... - Page 180
by Joseph Warton - 1806
Full view - About this book

Select Works of the British Poets, in a Chronological Series from Ben Jonson ...

John Aikin - English poetry - 1843 - 807 pages
...worth the seven: A light which in yourself you must perceive ; Jones and Le Notre have it not to give. 'tis time he should. He 's dead, you say ; then let...rot : I in glad the medalst were forgot I promis'd everywhere be spied, Where half the skill is decently to hide. He gains all poinla, who pleasingly...
Full view - About this book

The Southern literary messenger, Volume 10

1844
...well as the !<"el and the painter, nature, la belle nature, must be the model. In short, "To builr!, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the column,...sink the grot, In all, let nature never be forgot." Of the elements necessary to constitute a Landfc'ape Garden, namely, grounds, woods, water and buildings,...
Full view - About this book

The "monster" Misery of Ireland: A Practical Treatise on the Relation of ...

John Wiggins - Ireland - 1844 - 304 pages
...costs 400l. it is not done well, it is overdone : rather, let us quote — TO MAKE IMPROVEMENTS. 231 " To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the column, or the arch to bend, To raise the terrace, or to sink the grot, In all let nature never be forgot :" ie the nature of the subject....
Full view - About this book

The "Monster" Misery of Ireland; a Practical Treatise on the Relation of ...

John Wiggins - Ireland - 1844 - 304 pages
...a tenant of 20l. a-year costs 40(W. it is not done well, it is overdone : rather, let us quote— " To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the column, or the arch to bend, To raise the terrace, or to sink the grot, In all let nature never be forgot:" ie the nature of the subject....
Full view - About this book

The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope: To which is Prefixed, a Life of the ...

Alexander Pope - 1846
...the arch to bend, To swell the terrace, or to sink the grot, In all, let Nature never be forgot : 3C But treat the goddess like a modest fair, Nor over-dress, nor leave her wholly bare ; Let not each beauty every where be spied, Where half the skill is decently to hide. He gains all points, who pleasingly...
Full view - About this book

A Critical History of English Literature, Vol. 3, Volume 3

David Daiches - 1979 - 319 pages
...garden in Epistle IV of his Moral Essays and we see how the term "Nature" has shifted its meaning: To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the...over-dress, nor leave her wholly bare; Let not each beauty everywhere be spied, Where half the skill is decently to hide. He gains all points who pleasingly confounds,...
Limited preview - About this book

British Literary Manuscripts: From 800 to 1800, Volume 1

Verlyn Klinkenborg, Herbert Cahoon, Pierpont Morgan Library - Antiques & Collectibles - 1981 - 272 pages
...aesthetic that he and Pope advocated: a belief in proportion, in the decorum that nature provides. To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the Column, or the Arch to bend, To swell the Terras, or to sink the Grot; In all, let Nature never be forgot: [Starting with line 23:] Oft' have...
Limited preview - About this book

Samuel Richardson: Minute Particulars Within the Large Design

Marijke Rudnik-Smalbraak - Literary Criticism - 1983 - 291 pages
...(1731): Something there is more needful than Bxpence, And something previous ev'n to Taste - 'tis Sense: To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the Column, or the Arch to bend, To swell the Terras, or to sink the Grot; In all, let Nature never be forgot. Consult the Genius of the Place in...
Limited preview - About this book

Frances Burney: The Life in the Works

Margaret Anne Doody - Social Science - 1988 - 441 pages
...Nature by imitation of divine fiat. It is men who are the busy builders of the Augustan age, undertaking "To rear the Column, or the Arch to bend, / To swell the Terras, or to sink the Grot."23 Dubster is creating his own wonderful works; the journey over his house...
Limited preview - About this book

The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: Volume 4, The Eighteenth Century

George Alexander Kennedy, H. B. Nisbet, Claude Rawson, Raman Selden - Literary Criticism - 1989 - 970 pages
...well-known gardens at Twickenham), Pope advised the architect Lord Burlington in his 1731 Epistle: 'To build, to plant, whatever you intend, / To rear the Column, or the Arch to bend, / To swell the Terras, or to sink the Grot; / In all, 14 Shaftesbury, The Moralists, II, pp. 122, 115, 98. " Addison,...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF