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" To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the column, or the arch to bend, To swell the terrace, or to sink the grot; In all, let Nature never be forgot. "
An Essay on the Genius and Writings of Pope ... - Page 180
by Joseph Warton - 1806
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A history of English gardening

George William Johnson - 1829 - 445 pages
...compendious, but tho\ contain the fundamental principles of the Art. Four and twenty lines include the whole. To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the...wholly bare ; Let not each beauty ev'ry where be spy'd, Where half the skill is decently to hide. He gains all points, who pleasingly confounds, Surprises,...
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A History of English Gardening, Chronological, Biographical, Literary, and ...

George William Johnson - Gardening - 1829 - 445 pages
...fundamental principle! of the Art. Four and twenty lines include the whole. To build, to plant, whatever yon intend, To rear the column, or the arch to bend. To...wholly bare ; Let not each beauty ev'ry where be spy'd, Where half the skill is decently to hide. He gains all points, who pleasingly confounds, Surprise«,...
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A History of English Gardening, Chronological, Biographical, Literary, and ...

George William Johnson - Gardening - 1829 - 445 pages
...but tlinv contain the fundamental principles of the Art. Four and twenty lines include the whole, / To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the...In all, let nature never be forgot. But treat the Gwoddess like a modest fair, Nor over-dress, nor leave her wholly bare ; Let not each beauty ev'ry...
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science ..., Volume 16

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...the fault upon your lady who hurried you. Suivit. OVER-DRESS,*, a. Over and dress. To adorn lavishly. In all, let Nature never be forgot ; But treat the...modest fair. Nor over-dress nor leave her wholly bare. Pope. OVER-DRIVE', ». a. Over and drive. To drive too hard or beyond strength. The fiocks and herds...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of ..., Part 2, Volume 16

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...the fault upon your lady who hurried you. Swift. OVER-DRESS, va Over and dress. To adorn lavishly. In all, let Nature never be forgot ; But treat the goddess like a modest fair, Nor ocer-drea nor leave her wholly bare. Pope. OVER-DRIVE', «. a. Over and drive. To drive too hard or...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of ..., Volume 4, Part 2

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...wings witb lengthened honour let her spread, And, by her greatness, shew her builder't fame. Prior. To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the column, or the arch to bend. ''•',"•'• 657 Turn to the mole which Hadrian reared on high. Imperial mimick of old Egypt'i piles,...
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The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: To which is Prefixed the Life of ...

Alexander Pope - 1830 - 442 pages
...the seven A light which in yourself you must perceive j Jones and Le V,i > , • have it not to give. d, A prince the father of a people made. VI. Till...crown'd each patriarch sate, Kur.:, priest, and parent, : fiO But treat the goddess like a modest fair, Nor over-dress, nor leave her wholly bare ; Let not...
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The Lives of the Most Eminent British Painters, Sculptors, and ..., Volume 4

Allan Cunningham - Architects - 1831
...wisely urging the propriety of going hand in hand with nature, with the pencil as well as the spade. " To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the...over-dress nor leave her wholly bare. Let not each beauty every where be spied, Where half the skill is decently to hide. He gains all points who pleasingly...
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The works of Alexander Pope; with a memoir of the author, notes ..., Volume 2

Alexander Pope - 1835
...the seven : A light, which in yourself you must perceive ; 45 Jones and Le N6tre have it not to give. To build, to plant, whatever you intend, To rear the...the grot ; — In all, let Nature never be forgot : 50 But treat the goddess like a modest fair ; Nor over-dress, nor leave her wholly bare : Let not...
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The Poetical Works of A. Pope: Including His Translation of Homer , to which ...

Alexander Pope - English poetry - 1836 - 442 pages
...the »even : A light which in yourself you must perceive ; Jonea and Le Nôtre have it not to give. hackward steward for the poor; I« all, let Nature never be forgot : 50 But treat the goddess like a modest fair, Nor over-dress,...
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