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" Who, from the terror of this arm, so late Doubted his empire — that were low indeed; That were an ignominy and shame beneath This downfall; since by fate the strength of Gods, And this empyreal substance, cannot fail; Since, through experience of this... "
Blackwood's Magazine - Page 380
1852
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Paradise Lost: In Twelve Parts

John Milton - 1849 - 582 pages
...since, by fate, the strength of Gods And this empyreal substance cannot fail ; Since through experience of this great event In arms not worse, in foresight much advanced. We may with more successful hone resolve 120 To wage, by fbrce or guile, eternal war Irreconcilable to our grand foe, Who now triumphs,...
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Brownson's Quarterly Review, Volume 4

Orestes Augustus Brownson - American essays - 1850
...since by fate the strength of gods And this empyreal substance cannot fail ; Since through experience of this great event, In arms not worse, in foresight...of joy Sole reigning holds the tyranny of heaven. But in those mad days when I was animated by the spirit of the age, I was any thing but a friend to...
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Class Book of Prose and Poetry: Consisting of Selections from the Best ...

Truman Rickard, Hiram Orcutt - English language - 1850 - 120 pages
...strength of gods And this empyreal substance cannot fail ; Since through experience of this great event 35 In arms not worse, in foresight much advanced, We...grand foe, Who now triumphs, and, in the excess of joy 40 Sole reigning, holds the tyranny of heaven. EXERCISE XXXV. The Coliseum by Moonlight, — BYRON....
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Milton's Paradise Lost: With Copius Notes, Explanatory and Critical, Partly ...

John Milton, James Prendeville - 1850 - 382 pages
...IVJaf/O/jt'/JCSfS •j^r(K7//.K7t y_pb>'J t AUIX( jMS fit/i'jl-j TMV fl—-C,'J HXV70; (fM. " Irreconcileablc to our grand foe, " Who now triumphs, and in the excess...reigning holds the tyranny ' of Heaven." So spake th' apostate angel, though in pain, Vaunting aloud, but rack'd with deep despair : 2 And him thus answer'd...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem in Twelve Books

John Milton - 1850 - 294 pages
...since, by fate, the strength of Gods And this empyreal substance cannot fail ; Since through experience of this great event In arms not worse, in foresight much advanced. We may with more successful hone resolve 120 To wage, by force or guile, eternal war Irreconcilable to our grand Foe, Who now triumphs,...
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Milton: A Sheaf of Gleanings After His Biographers and Annotators: I ...

Joseph Hunter - 1850 - 72 pages
...say to Adam — Satan, we call him now, his former name Is heard no more in Heaven. Book I., 1. 123. And, in the excess of joy, Sole reigning, holds the TYRANNY of Heaven. The rule, the sole authority : but Satan is skilfully made to select a word which, while it expressed...
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Hunter's Tracts

Joseph Hunter - 1850
...say to Adam — Satan, we call him now, his former name Is heard no more in Heaven. Book I., 1. 123. And, in the excess of joy, Sole reigning, holds the TYRANNY of Heaven. Book I., 1. 203. Him, haply, slumbering on the Norway foam, The pilot of some small NIGH r-roi'N IM.KKD...
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Paradise Lost

John Milton - Authors, English - 1851 - 415 pages
...hy foree or guile eternal war, Irreeoneileahle to our grand Foe, Who now triumphs, and in the exeess of joy Sole reigning holds the tyranny of heaven. So spake the apostate angel, though in pain, m t What though the field he lot! f All u not lott. This passage is an exeellent improvement upon Satan's...
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Paradiso perduto di Milton

John Milton - English poetry - 1852
...fail : Since through experience of this great event , In arms not worse, in foresight much advanc'd, We may with more successful hope resolve To wage by force or guile eternal war, Irreconcileable to our grand foe, Who now triumphs, and, in th' excess of joy Sole reigning, holds...
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Studies from the English poets

George Frederick Graham - English literature - 1852 - 519 pages
...or enemy. idiom. * Snpply the ellipsis (thou beest). 4 Made of fire. * His power .... who ; ie the In arms not worse, in foresight much advanced, We may, with more successful hope, resolve 130 To wage, by force or guile, eternal war, Irreconcilable to our grand ' Foe, Who now triumphs, and,...
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