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Books Books 41 - 50 of 168 on This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabrick; wherein yet nothing did perish....
" This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabrick; wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw, and a few forsaken cloaks; only one man had his breeches set on fire, that would perhaps have broiled him, if he had not, by the benefit of a provident... "
The Book of table-talk [ed. by C. MacFarlane]. - Page 118
by Book - 1847
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The Dramatic Works of Massinger and Ford

John Ford - English drama - 1875 - 662 pages
...in a letter to his nephew, concludes thus :— " This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric, wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw,...forsaken cloaks; only one man had his breeches set on flre, that would perhaps have broiled him, if he had not, by thebenrfltof a provident wit, put it out...
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A Cyclopedia Of Costume Vol. II A General History Of Costume In Europe

James Robinson Planche - 1819
...greatness very familiar, if not ridiculous." In contradiction to the ballad, however, he asserts that "nothing did perish but wood and straw, and a few...his breeches set on fire, that would, perhaps, have broiled him if he had not, by benefit of a provident wit, put it out with bottled ale,'' l The masque...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: Henry V. Henry VIII

William Shakespeare - 1880
...than an hour the whole house to the very ground. This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric ; wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw, and a few forsaken cloaks." Some of the circumstances here related clearly point to the play in hand. Sir Henry, to be sure, speaks...
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The Complete Works of William Shakespeare: With a Life of the ..., Volumes 11-12

William Shakespeare - 1880
...than an hour the whole house to the very ground. This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric ; wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw, and a few forsaken cloaks." title " All is True" ; but the other two authorities describe it as " the play of Henry the Eighth.'1''...
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Shakespeare's King Henry the Eighth: With Introduction, and Notes ...

William Shakespeare, Henry Norman Hudson - 1880 - 196 pages
...than an hour the whole house to the very ground. This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric ; wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw, and a few forsaken cloaks." Some of the circumstances here specified clearly point to the play which has come down to us as Shakespeare's....
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Shakespeare's History of King Henry the Eighth

William Shakespeare - 1881 - 210 pages
...the trial of the Queen formed a part of the play. This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric, wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw,...his breeches set on fire, that would perhaps have broiled him if he had not, by the benefit of a provident wit, put it out with bottle ale." Howes, in...
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Walford's Antiquarian Magazine and Bibliographical Review, Volume 8

George W. Redway, Edward Walford - Archaeology - 1885
...inwardly and ran round like a train, consuming in less than an hour the whole House to the very ground ; nothing did perish but wood and straw, and a few forsaken cloaks, and one man had his breeches set on fire." Another letter : " But it was a great marvel and grace of...
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The Works of Shakespeare ...

William Shakespeare - 1883
...than an hour tho*wbole house to the very ground. This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric, wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw,...his breeches set on fire, that would perhaps have broiled him, if he had not, by the benefit of a provident wit, put it out with bottle ale." From all...
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The Works of Shakespeare: the Text Carefully Restored According to the First ...

William Shakespeare - English drama - 1883
...than an hour the whole house to (he very ground. This was ihe fatal period of that virtuous fabric, wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw,...his breeches set on fire, that would perhaps have broiled him, if he had not, by the benefit of a provident wit, put it out with bottle ale." From all...
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Henry VIII. Two noble kinsmen...by...Mr John Fletcher and Mr. William ...

William Shakespeare - 1884
...the trial of the Queen formed a part of the play. This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric, wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw,...his breeches set on fire, that would perhaps have broiled him if he had not, by the benefit of a provident wit, put it out with bottle ale." Howes, in...
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