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" No political dreamer was ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the States, and of compounding the American people into one common mass. "
An Argument on the Unconstitutionality of Slavery: Embracing an Abstract of ... - Page 385
by George Washington Frost Mellen - 1841 - 440 pages
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Laboratory of Justice: The Supreme Court's 200-Year Struggle to Integrate ...

David L. Faigman - History - 2004 - 417 pages
...considering the Constitution, the people assembled in their respective states. "Where else," he asked, "should they have assembled?" "No political dreamer...ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the states, and of compounding the American people into one common mass. Of consequence,...
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Common Sense Justice for the Nation's Capital: An Examination of Proposals ...

United States, United States. Congress. House. Committee on Government Reform - Political rights - 2004 - 271 pages
...roles of Stales and the people in the ratification of the Constitution, "[i]l is true, [the people] assembled in their several states - and where else should they have assembled?"*") The District is now similarly capable of undertaking that role. Because the right to vote belongs to...
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The Life of John Marshall, Volume 4

Albert Jeremiah Beveridge - Biography & Autobiography - 2005 - 704 pages
...legislatures, the instrument was submitted to the people. " " They acted upon it in the only manner in which they can act safely, effectively, and wisely, on such...ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the states, and of compounding the American people into one common mass. Of consequence,...
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American Political Rhetoric: A Reader

Peter Augustine Lawler, Robert Martin Schaefer - Political Science - 2005 - 427 pages
...legislatures, the instrument was submitted to the people. They acted upon it, in the only manner in which they can act safely, effectively, and wisely, on such...ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the states, and of compounding the American people into one common mass. Of consequence,...
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American Law in a Global Context: The Basics

George P. Fletcher, Steve Sheppard - Law - 2005 - 682 pages
...Legislatures, the instrument was submitted to the people. They acted upon it in the only manner in which they can act safely, effectively, and wisely, on such a subject, by assembling in Convention.3 It is true, they assembled in their several States — and where else should they have...
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American Law in a Global Context: The Basics

George P. Fletcher, Steve Sheppard - Law - 2005 - 696 pages
...argument in the ratification clause and he was ready with a response: "It is true, they [the people] assembled in their several States — and where else should they have assembled?" In other words, the fact that the people met and voted state by state did not mean that the states...
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Powers Reserved for the People and the States: A History of the Ninth and ...

Thomas B. McAffee, Jay S. Bybee, A. Christopher Bryant - Law - 2006 - 290 pages
...maintained that the Constitution was adopted by the people, who acted upon it in the only manner in which they can act safely, effectively, and wisely on such...ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the States, and of compounding the American people into one common mass. Of consequence,...
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Democracy's Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in ...

Joshua A. Chafetz - Law - 2007 - 307 pages
...length: [T]he instrument was submitted to the people. They acted upon it in the only manner in which they can act safely, effectively, and wisely, on such...States — and where else should they have assembled? . . . Of consequence, when they act, they act in their States. But the measures they adopt do not,...
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Evolution of the Judicial Opinion: Institutional and Individual Styles

William D. Popkin - Law - 2007 - 301 pages
...[The draft constitution] was submitted to the people. They acted upon it in the only manner in which they can act safely, effectively and wisely, on such a subject, by assembling in convention. . . . The government proceeds directly from the people; is ordained and established, in the name of...
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Aggressive Nationalism: McCulloch v. Maryland and the Foundation of Federal ...

Richard E. Ellis - Law - 2007 - 280 pages
...made this point, Marshall reiterated his observation from his decision in McCulloch v. Maryland that "no political dreamer was ever wild enough to think of breaking down the lines which separate the states, and of compounding the American people into one mass." Marshall concluded...
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