Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Offices, which are a right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereunto belonging, are also incorporeal hereditaments, whether public, as those of magistrates, or private, as of bailiffs, receivers, and the... "
Commentaries on the Laws of England,: In Four Books - Page 34
by William Blackstone - 1794
Full view - About this book

A Handbook of Politics for 1868 [to 1894]

Edward McPherson - United States - 1872
...able to execute them." (1 Bl. Com., 271, 272.) Officers, says Blackstone, have a right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereunto belonging, and are also incorporeal hereditaments. (2 Bl. Com., 36.) All citizens of the State, whether white...
Full view - About this book

Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the District Courts of ..., Volume 2

Robert Dewey Benedict, Benjamin Lincoln Benedict - Law reports, digests, etc - 1870
...City of New York (2 Sandf. 355), Sandford, J., at page 3C8, says, "An office is a right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereunto belonging (2 Black. Com. 36). And a public officer is every one Platt, Receiver, <tc., v. B«ach. who is appointed...
Full view - About this book

A Law Dictionary and Glossary: Containing Full Definitions of the ..., Volume 2

Alexander Mansfield Burrill - Dictionaries, Law - 1870
...Alabama R.15Q, arg. A station or employment conferred by election of the people. A right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereto belonging. 2 Bl. Com. 36. 1 CrabUs Real Prop. 431, § 530. A species of incorporeal hereditament....
Full view - About this book

Documents Accompanying the Journal, Part 1

Michigan. Legislature. Senate - Michigan - 1871
...title "Office and Officers.'' Blackstone, in substance, says: "An office is a right to ex• •rcise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereto belonging." — 2 Black. Com., 31. Kent says: "Offices are a species of incorporeal hereditaments,...
Full view - About this book

Commentaries on the Laws of England: In Four Books, Volume 1

William Blackstone - Law - 1872
...to abandon the same. Jjuttrel's Case, 4 Rep. 86 ; Hale v. V. Offices, which are a right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereunto belonging, are also incorporeal hereditaments ; whether public, as those of magistrates ; or private, as of bailiifs,...
Full view - About this book

Pennsylvania Law Journal Reports: Containing Cases Decided by the ..., Volume 1

John Alexander Clark - Law reports, digests, etc - 1872
...intrusted to his care. Now an office (officium) is defined by Blackstone to be a right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereunto belonging. Officers are public or private. Every man is a public officer who hath any duty to perform concerning...
Full view - About this book

Blackstone Economized: Being a Compendium of the Laws of England to the ...

William Blackstone, David Mitchell Aird - Law - 1873 - 368 pages
...an interest and a right, though another is the owner of the soil. 5. OFFICES are a right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereunto belonging. For instance, public, as in the case of magistrates, or private, as of bailiffs, receivers, and the...
Full view - About this book

The Central Law Journal, Volume 92

Law - 1921
...views in reference to public offices. "At common law an office was defined to be a right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments thereunto belonging, whether public or private," but now we have the rule, that "In America public offices are created for...
Full view - About this book

A New Law Dictionary and Institute of the Whole Law: For the Use of Students ...

Archibald Brown - Electronic books - 1874 - 391 pages
...are generally termed misdemeanors. OFFICE (uflcium). An office is defined to bo the right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments belonging thereto ; and it is considered in law a species of incorporeal hereditament. Se* also next...
Full view - About this book

Commentaries on the Laws of England, Volume 1

Herbert Broom, Edward Alfred Hadley - Law - 1875
...usually included amongst incorporeal hereditaments are certain offices. An office is a right to exercise a public or private employment, and to take the fees and emoluments belonging to it. They are either public or private ; the former are those which (A) R. v. Butter, 2...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF