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" I am drawing near to the close of my career ; I am fast shuffling off the stage. I have been perhaps the most voluminous author of the day ; and it is a comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principle,... "
Tait's Edinburgh Magazine - Page 323
edited by - 1838
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Golden hours, ed. by W.M. Whittemore

William Meynell Whittemore - 1883
...the old'Abbey? I have been, perhaps, the most voluminous author of the day, and it is a comfort for me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principles, and that I have written nothing which on my deathbed I should wish blotted." To be able...
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Lady of the Lake

Walter Scott - 1885 - 219 pages
...fast shuffling off the stage. I have been perhaps the most voluminous author of the day ; and it is a comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principle." In the social relations of life, where men are most effectually tried, no spot can be detected in him....
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The Dublin Review, Volume 99

Nicholas Patrick Wiseman - 1886
...shuffling off the stage. I have been, perhaps, the most voluminous author of the day ; and it is a comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principles, and that I have written nothing which on my deathbed I should wish blotted out." But it...
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Bryant, and His Friends: Some Reminiscences of the Knickerbocker Writers

James Grant Wilson - American literature - 1886 - 443 pages
...great contemporary on his dying bed might most fitly have been uttered by Washington Irving : " It is a comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principles, and that I have written nothing which on my deathbed I should wish blotted." No writer...
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Literary Workers: Or Pilgrims to the Temple of Honour

John George Hargreaves - Authors - 1889 - 354 pages
...Walter's testimony, for he, as he said, had been perhaps the most voluminous author of his day : ' It is a comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principles, and that I have written nothing which on my deathbed I would wish to blot.' Was there ever...
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Scott's Lady of the Lake

Walter Scott - 1890 - 218 pages
...fast shuffling off the stage. I have been perhaps the most voluminous author of the day ; and it is a comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principle." In the social relations of life, where men are most effectually tried, no spot can be detected in him....
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Gray Days and Gold in England and Scotland

William Winter - England - 1892 - 334 pages
...perhaps, the most voluminous author of the day,!' he said, toward the close of his life; "and it is a comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principles, and that I have written nothing which, on my deathbed, I should wish blotted," When at...
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The Quiver

1892
...Walter Scott near the end of his life : " I have been the most voluminous author of the day. It /4- a comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principles, 'The trees are waking to new life." and that I liavewritten nothing T should wish hlotted.''...
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Gray Days and Gold in England and Scotland

William Winter - England - 1892 - 334 pages
...comfort to me to think that I have tried to unsettle no man's faith, to corrupt no man's principles, and that I have written nothing which, on my deathbed, I should wish blotted," When at last he lay upon that deathbed the same thought animated and sustained him. "My dear," he said,...
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Poets, the Interpreters of Their Age

Anna Swanwick - Poetry - 1892 - 392 pages
...tone, recalling the words which he uttered shortly before his death, "It is a comfort to me to think that I have written nothing which, on my death-bed, I should wish blotted." His intense sympathy with the spirit of the past enabled him to reproduce the varied features of the...
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