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" From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty : As surfeit is the father of much fast, So every scope by the immoderate use Turns to restraint : Our natures do pursue, (Like rats that ravin down their proper bane,) A thirsty evil ; and when we drink, we die. "
Measure for measure. Comedy of errors - Page 15
by William Shakespeare - 1788
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The Plays of William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare - 1827 - 791 pages
...it will not, so ; yet still 'tis just. Lucio. Why, how now, Claudio ? whence come this restraint ? lban's and London. P. Hen. How might we see Falstaff bestow himse fattier of mnch fast, fio every scope by the immoderate use, Turns to restraint t Our natures do pursoe,...
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The Dramatic Works of Shakespeare: With a Life, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1828
...From too much liherty, my Lucio, As surfeit is the father of much fast, [liherty ; So every scope hy the immoderate use Turns to restraint : Our natures...do pursue, (Like rats that ravin down their proper hane) A thirsty evil ; and when we drink, we die. Lucio. If I could speak so wisely under an arrest,...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, George Steevens - 1829
...it will not, so ; yet still 'tis just. Lucia. Whv, how now, Claudio ? whence comes .this restraint ? Claud. From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty :...immoderate use Turns to restraint : our natures do pursue (bike rats that ravin1 down their proper bane,) A thirsty evil ; and when we drink, we die. Lucio....
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The London Encyclopaedia: Or, Universal Dictionary of Science ..., Volume 19

Thomas Curtis - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1829
...give the people коре, Twould be my tyranny to strike and gall them For what I bid them do. 1Л. As surfeit is the father of much fast. So every scope, by the immoderate use, Turns to restraint. Id. We should impute the war to the море at which it aimeth. Raleigh. The scop« of land granted...
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors, Volume 2

John Timbs - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1829
...that would have fine guests, let him have a fine wife. — Ben Jonson. MCCL. (Like rats that ravine down their proper bane) A thirsty evil; and when we drink, we die. Shakspeare. MCCLI, Query. — Whether churches are not dormitories of the living, as well as of the...
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Laconics: Or, The Best Words of the Best Authors

Laconics, John Timbs - Aphorisms and apothegms - 1829
...He that would have fine guests, let him have a fine wife.—Ben Janson. MCCL. (Like rats that ravine down their proper bane) A thirsty evil; and when we drink, we die. Shakspeare. MCCLI. Query.—Whether churches are not dormitories of the living, as well as of the dead?—Swift....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakspeare, Volume 2

William Shakespeare, William Harness - 1830
...it will not, so ; yet still 'tis just/ Lucio. Why, how now, Claudio? whence comes this restraint ? Claud. From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty :...restraint ; Our natures do pursue, (Like rats that ravin8 down their proper bane,) A thirsty evil : and when we drink, we die. Lucio. If I could speak...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831
...so ; yet still 'tis just. Lucio. Why, how now, Claudio? и пенсе comes this restraint 7 ClauJ. From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty : As surfeit...rats that ravin* down their proper bane,) A thirsty eril ; and when we drink, we die. Lucio. If 1 could speak so wisely under ал arrest, I would send...
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The Dramatic Works, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1831 - 504 pages
...it will not, so ; yet still 'tis just. Lucio. Why, how now, Claudio? whence comes this restraint / Claud. From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty :...restraint ; our natures do pursue (Like rats that ravin1 down their proper bane,) A thirsty evil ; and when we drink, we die, Lucio. If 1 could speak...
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The plays and poems of Shakspeare [according to the text of E ..., Volume 2

William Shakespeare - 1832
...will not, so ; yet still 'tis just. Lucio. Why, how now, Claudio ? whence comes this restraint ? Clau. From too much liberty, my Lucio, liberty : As surfeit is the father of much fast, So every scope l by the immoderate use Turns to restraint. Our natures do pursue (Like rats that ravin- down their...
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