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Books Books 11 - 20 of 47 on I mean the lengthening of a phrase by the addition of words, which may either be....
" I mean the lengthening of a phrase by the addition of words, which may either be inserted or omitted, as also by the extending or contracting of particular words by the insertion or omission of certain syllables. "
The Classical Journal - Page 27
1824
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The Poetical Works of John Milton,: With Notes of Various Authors. To which ...

John Milton, Henry John Todd - 1809
...by the inlertion or omiffion of certain fyllables. Milton has put in practice this method of raifing his language, as far as the nature of our tongue will permit; as, in the paflage before mentioned, eremite, for what is hermit, in common difcourfe. If you obferve the meafure...
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The Spectator, Volume 5

1810
...than with that of any other tongue, and is therefore more used by Homer than by any other poet. I mean the lengthening of a phrase by the addition of words,...insertion or omission of certain syllables. Milton h<is put in practice this method of raising his language, as far as the nature of our tongue will permit,...
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The Spectator, Volume 5

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1810
...with that of any other .tongue, and is therefore more used by Homer than by any other poet : I mean ;the lengthening of a phrase by the addition of words...•the insertion or omission of certain syllables. Miltton has put in practice this method of raising his language, as far as the nature of , our tongue...
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The British Essayists: To which are Prefixed Prefaces ..., Volume 1

James Ferguson (advocate.) - English essays - 1819
...than with that of any other tongue, and is therefore more used by Homer than by any other poet. I mean the lengthening of a phrase by the addition of words,...nature of our tongue will permit, as in the passage above mentioned, eremite, for what is hermit in common discourse. If you observe the measure of his...
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The British Essayists: Spectator

James Ferguson - English essays - 1823
...than with that of any other tongue, and is therefore more used by Homer than by any other poet. I mean the lengthening of a phrase by the addition of words,...nature of our tongue will permit, as in the passage above mentioned, eremite, for what is hermit in common discourse. If you observe the measure of his...
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Paradise Lost: A Poem

John Milton - 1833 - 351 pages
...than with that of any other tongue, and is therefore more used by Homer than by any other poet; I mean the lengthening of a phrase by the addition of words...Milton has put in practice this method of raising his Iangunge, as far as the nature of our tongue will permit, as in the passage before-mentioned, eremite.,...
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Spectator (The)

English essays - 1836 - 714 pages
...than with that of any other tongue, and i therefore more used by Homer than by any other poeL I mean the lengthening of a phrase by the addition of words,...Milton has put in practice this method of raising bis language, as far as the nature of oe tongue will permit, as in the passage above mentioned, eremite,...
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The Works of Joseph Addison, Volumes 1-2

Joseph Addison - 1842
...with that of any other tongue, and is therefore more used by Homer than by any othei _x>et; I mean ul. I was yesterday walking alone in one of my friend's...morality, and the source of all the pleasing hopes arid above mentioned, eremite, for what is hermit in common discourse. If you observe the measure of his...
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The Paradise Lost

John Milton - Bible - 1850 - 542 pages
...the greater sound, and throw it out of prose. Sometimes particular words are extended or contracted by the insertion or omission of certain syllables....as far as the nature of our tongue will permit, as eremite for hermit. For the sake of the measure of his verse, he has with great judgment suppressed...
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THE PARADISE LOST

JOHN MILTON - 1851
...prose. Sometimes particular words are extended or contracted by the insertion or omission ot^certain syllables. Milton has put in practice this method...as far as the nature of our tongue will permit, as eremite for hermit. For the sake of the measure of his verse, he has with great judgment suppressed...
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