Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as Little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the state. "
From Adam Smith to the Wealth of America - Page 21
by Alvin Rabushka - 1985 - 237 pages
Limited preview - About this book

Ireland and England, or The Irish land and Church questions

Charles Tennant - 1868
...referred to is, to show that, the present system of Taxation is not " so contrived as to take out and keep out of the pockets of the people as little as...above what it brings into the public treasury of the State," but quite the contrary, and to show this, the Actual Cost and Estimated Indirect Loss incurred...
Full view - About this book

Annual Report of the Secretary of the Treasury on the State of the Finances

United States. Department of the Treasury - Finance, Public - 1868
...It is one of the maxims of Adam Smith that " every tax ought to be so contrived as to take out and keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above what it brings into the treasury of the State." The reasonableness of this principle is self-evident, for it but states the...
Full view - About this book

Ireland and England: Or, The Irish Land and Church Questions

Charles Tennant - Church and state - 1868 - 190 pages
...exception of the Land Tax, which is unequally, and, therefore, unjustly assessed. Adam Smith said: — "Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and keep out of the pockets of the people, as little as possible over and above what it brings into the...
Full view - About this book

Arts and Sciences: Or, Fourth Division of "The English Encyclopedia", Volume 8

Charles Knight - Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1868
...levied at the time or in the manner most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it." IV. " Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above what it brings into the...
Full view - About this book

The English Cyclopaedia

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1868
...levied at the time or in the manner most likely to be convenient for the contributor to pay it." IV. " ӦN A\% & KGa@ o Rjp { R5 M K { > W keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above what it brings into the...
Full view - About this book

The Merchants' Magazine and Commercial Review, Volume 58

William Buck Dana - Commerce - 1868
...based, "that every tax ought to be so contrived as to take out and keep out of the pockets of tlie people as little as possible over and above what it brings into the Treasury of the State." While the entire correctness of this principle has been universally admitted,...
Full view - About this book

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, Volume 2

Adam Smith - Economics - 1869
...considerable incouveniency from such taxes. IV. Every tax ought to be so contrived as lx>th to lake out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as...above what it brings into the public treasury of the state. A tax may either take out or keep out of the pockets of the people a great deal more than it...
Full view - About this book

The Science of Wealth: A Manual of Political Economy. Embracing the Laws of ...

Amasa Walker - Economics - 1869 - 496 pages
...consideraeration, will readily be admitted as proper. IV. " Every tax ought to be so contrived as to take out and keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into the treasury of the state." Although the soundness of this principle would seem indisputable, and will...
Full view - About this book

American Political Economy

Francis Bowen - 1870
...must be his own fault if he ever suffers any considerable inconveniency from such taxes." Fourthly, " Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take...above what it brings into the public treasury of the state." The first of these rules, as here stated without qualification, is far from being well founded....
Full view - About this book

American Political Economy: Including Strictures on the Management of the ...

Francis Bowen - Economics - 1870 - 495 pages
...must be his own fault if he ever suffers any considerable incouveniency from such taxes." Fourthly, " Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take...above what it brings into the public treasury of the state." The first of these rules, ns here stated without qualification, is fur from being well founded....
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search