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Books Books 61 - 70 of 93 on And whereas it is and hath been found by experience, that the office of a King in....
" And whereas it is and hath been found by experience, that the office of a King in this nation and Ireland, and to have the power thereof in any single person, is unnecessary, burdensome, and dangerous to the liberty, safety and public interest of the... "
The Pictorial History of England: Being, a History of the People, as Well as ... - Page 399
by George Lillie Craik - 1841
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The Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution, 1625-1660

Samuel Rawson Gardiner - Constitutional history - 1906 - 476 pages
...and hath been found by experience, that the office of a King in this nation and Ireland, and to have the power thereof in any single person, is unnecessary,...liberty, safety, and public interest of the people, and that for the most part, use hath been made of the regal power and prerogative to oppress and impoverish...
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A Short History of MediŠval and Modern Times: For Colleges and High Schools

Philip Van Ness Myers - Middle Ages - 1906 - 438 pages
...Commonwealth. — A few weeks after the execution of Charles the Commons voted to abolish the office of king as "unnecessary, burdensome, and dangerous to the liberty, safety, and public interest of the people," and also to do away with the House of Lords as likewise " useless and dangerous to the people of England,"...
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General History for Colleges and High Schools

Philip Van Ness Myers - World history - 1906 - 779 pages
...Commonwealth. — A few weeks after the execution of Charles the Commons voted to abolish the office of king as "unnecessary, burdensome, and dangerous to the liberty, safety, and public interest of the people," and also to do away with the House of Lords as likewise " useless and dangerous to the people of England,"...
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The History of England from the Accession of James I. to the Restoration ...

Francis Charles Montague - Great Britain - 1907 - 514 pages
...XVIdangerous, and ought to be abolished. On February 7 they resolved that the office and power of a king were unnecessary, burdensome, and dangerous to the liberty, safety, and public interest of the people, and ought to be abolished. Both resolutions were converted into acts.1 A republic was thus virtually...
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Yale Studies in English, Volumes 49-51

1914
...found by Experience, and this House doth declare, that the Office of a King in this Nation, and to have the Power thereof in any Single Person, is unnecessary,...burdensome, and dangerous to the Liberty, Safety, and publick Interest of the People of this Nation ; and therefore ought to be abolished : And that an Act...
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The Privy Council of England in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth ..., Volume 1

Edward Raymond Turner - Ghana - 1927 - 464 pages
...found by Experience, and this House doth declare, That the Office of a King in this Nation, and to have the Power thereof in any Single Person, is unnecessary,...burdensome, and dangerous to the Liberty, Safety, and publick Interest of the People of this Nation ; and therefore ought to be abolished : And that an Act...
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English Constitutional Conflicts of the Seventeenth Century: 1603-1689

J. R. Tanner - History - 1928 - 315 pages
...declared that it hath been found by experience . . . that the office of a King in this nation, and to have the power thereof in any single person, is unnecessary,...this nation, and therefore ought to be abolished. 1 Thus the monarchy and the House of Lords perished together, and "in their death they were not divided"....
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 187

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle) - English literature - 1898
...restored Monarchy, and set up again the royal office which four years before had been declared to be ' unnecessary, burdensome, and dangerous to the liberty, safety, and public interest of the people.' By the new constitution a co-ordinate power existed in Protector and Council representing the executive,...
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The Stuart Constitution, 1603-1688: Documents and Commentary

J. P. Kenyon - History - 1986 - 478 pages
...and hath been found by experience that the office of a king in this nation and Ireland, and to have the power thereof in any single person, is unnecessary,...liberty, safety and public interest of the people, and that for the most part use hath been made of the regal power and prerogative to oppress and impoverish...
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Nationalism: Five Roads to Modernity

Liah Greenfeld - History - 1992 - 581 pages
...that "it is and has been found by experience that the office of a King in this nation and Ireland ... is unnecessary, burdensome, and dangerous to the liberty, safety, and public interest of the people." It therefore enacted "that the office of a King in this nation shall not henceforth" be, whereas "a...
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