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" There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have ; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. "
The first (-sixth) 'Standard' reader - Page 267
by James Stuart Laurie - 1863
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The Plays of William Shakspeare, Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1823
...feel my heart new open'd : O, how wretched Is that poor man, that hangs on princes' favours ' There 1s betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That sweet...falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. — Enter Cromwell, anuuecUy. • Why, how now, Cromwell ? Crom. I have no power to speak, sir. Wol....
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, in Ten Volumes: Richard the Third ...

William Shakespeare - 1823
...ye ; ! feel my heart new open'd : O, how wretched Is that poor man, that hangs on princes' favours ! There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That...women have ; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Vever to hope again.— [Exeunt all but WOLSEY. Enter CROMWELL amazedly. \\'hy, how now, Cromwell ?...
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The plays of William Shakspeare, pr. from the text of the ..., Volume 6

William Shakespeare - 1823
...that I feel my heart new open'd: O, how wretched Is that poor man, that hangs on princes' favours ! There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, 2 More pangs and fears than wars or women have; And when he fails, he falls like Lucifer, Never to...
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Lessons in Elocution: Or, a Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse for the ...

William Scott - Elocution - 1823 - 372 pages
...smile he would aspire to, That sweet regard of princes, and his ruin, More pangs and fears 'than war or women have ; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. ' [Enter Cromwell. Why, how now, Cromwell '! Crom. 1 have no power to speak, Sir. ; Wol. What, amaz'd...
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The Beauties of Shakespeare: Selected from Each Play : with a General Index ...

William Shakespeare, William Dodd - Fore-edge painting - 1824 - 385 pages
...hate ye; I feel my heart new open'd: O, how wretched Is that poor man, that hangs on princes' favours! There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That...falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. CARDINAL WOLSEY'S SPEECH TO CROMWELL. Cromwell, I did not think to shed a tear In all my miseries;...
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Shakespeare Lexicon and Quotation Dictionary

Alexander Schmidt, Gregor Sarrazin - Literary Collections - 1971 - 1484 pages
...which the enemy makes); cf. above: time's r. Lucr. 1451. Hence similarly with the possessive pronoun: there is betwixt that smile we would aspire to, that sweet aspect of princes , and Aer г., more pangs and fears than wars or women have, H8 III, 2, 369 (= the ruin which they cause)....
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Beyond Tragedy: Structure & Experience in Shakespeare's Romances, Volume 10

Robert W. Uphaus - Literary Criticism - 1981 - 150 pages
...his fall: Vain pomp and glory of this world, I hate ye! I feel my heart new open'd. O how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favors! There...falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. (III.ii.365-72) Then, after declaring, "The King has cur'd me, / I humbly thank his Grace" (380-81),...
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An Audition Handbook of Great Speeches

Jerry Blunt - Acting - 1990 - 207 pages
...hate ye. I feel my heart now open'd. O how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes; favours! There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That...falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. (57) Act III, Scene 2: Wolsey has just spoken with his faithful follower and pupil, Cromwell, who now...
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Shakespeare and the Poet's Life

Gary Schmidgall - Biography & Autobiography - 1990 - 234 pages
...oddly but tellingly like Wolsey, the last of Shakespeare's proud but doomed suitors: O how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favors! There...ruin. More pangs and fears than wars or women have. [H8 3.2.366-70] The second subject that Venus and Adonis opens to consideration concerns the motivation...
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Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations

Suzy Platt - Quotations, English - 1993 - 520 pages
...hate ye! I feel my heart new open'd. O, how wretched Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favours! There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That...falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Henry VIII, act III, scene ii, lines 350-72. Cardinal Wolsey is speaking about...
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