Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books
" No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, but... "
International Cases: Arbitrations and Incidents Illustrative of ... - Page 153
by Ellery Cory Stowell, Henry Fraser Munro - 1916
Full view - About this book

Status of Forces Agreements: Hearings Before the Committee on ..., Part 2

United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs - Criminal jurisdiction - 1955 - 947 pages
...unjust. Rather they tend to prove a statement made by Chief Justice Marshall in another famous case that "no principle of general law is more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality of nations." As indicated at the very beginning of the article, America is dealing with partners and Allies, not...
Full view - About this book

United States Supreme Court Reports, Volume 6

United States. Supreme Court - Law reports, digests, etc - 1882
...right to be lost ? Each may renounce it for its own people; but can this renunciation affect others? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all by the consent of all, can be devested only by consent; and this...
Full view - About this book

Report

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace - 1916
...right to be lost? Each may renounce it for its own people ; but can this renunciation affect others ? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged,...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all, by the consent of all, can be divested only by consent; and...
Full view - About this book

International Conciliation, Issues 40-61

Arbitration, International - 1911
...second quarter of the Nineteenth Century, when Chief Justice Marshall emphasized it in the words, " No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality of nations." 2 In this first quarter of the Twentieth Century, there is not only a disposition to deny the reality...
Full view - About this book

Drug use in America: problem in perspective. v. 3: Appendix, Volume 3

United States. Commission on Marihuana and Drug Abuse - Drug abuse - 1973
...has occurred or is focused abroad. As the United States Supreme Court explained in The Antelope: 16 No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality of nations. ... It results from this equality that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. Each legislates...
Full view - About this book

Recueil Des Cours, Collected Courses 1980

Law - 1982 - 377 pages
...absolute independence of States"140. And in The Antelope (1825), in an oft-repeated dictum, he declared: "No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged...equality, that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another141." Principle More Honoured in the Breach than in the Observance Despite all the assertions...
Limited preview - About this book

Recueil Des Cours, Collected Courses 1980

Law - 1984 - 377 pages
...weight "as the vote of the largest and most powerful". Chief Justice Marshall's famous dictum states : "No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged...equality that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another243." This may lead to the temptation to accept the egalitarian approach : to States as to men....
Limited preview - About this book

The structure and process of internatiobnal law: essays in legal philosophy ...

Ronald St John MacDonald, Douglas Millar Johnston - Law - 1983 - 1 pages
...equality a part of a state's policy. When Chief Justice Marshall declared in The Antelope case that 'no principle of general law is more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality of nations,' he was expressing the legal view which agreed with the main current of American public sentiment that...
Limited preview - About this book

First Things: An Inquiry Into the First Principles of Morals and Justice

Hadley Arkes - Philosophy - 1986 - 432 pages
...a "law" was universal in its reach only if it were universally accepted, and as Marshall remarked, "no principle of general law is more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality of nations":3 It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. Each...
Limited preview - About this book

International Law and the Use of Force: Beyond the UN Charter Paradigm

Anthony C. Arend, Robert J. Beck - Law - 1993 - 272 pages
...juridically equal to one another. As Chief Justice Marshall would later state in the famous Antelope case, '[n]o principle of general law is more universally...the perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva [then an independent state) have equal rights.'34 Third, and following from these two previous points,...
Limited preview - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download EPUB
  5. Download PDF