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" No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, but... "
International Cases: Arbitrations and Incidents Illustrative of ... - Page 153
by Ellery Cory Stowell, Henry Fraser Munro - 1916
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Foreign Policy of President Wilson: Messages, Addresses and Papers

James Brown Scott - United States - 1918
...right to be lost ? Each may renounce it for its own people ; but can this renunciation affect others No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged,...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all, by the consent of all. can be divested only by consent ; and...
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President Wilson's Foreign Policy: Messages, Addresses, Papers

United States. President (1913-1921 : Wilson), Woodrow Wilson - United States - 1918 - 424 pages
...right to be lost ? Each may renounce it for its own people; but can this renunciation affect others? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged,...another. Each legislates for itself, but its legislation ean operate on itself alone. A right, thea, which is vested in all, by the consent of all. can be divested...
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A World Court in the Light of the United States Supreme Court

Thomas Willing Balch - Arbitration (International law) - 1918 - 165 pages
...Justice Marshall in The Antelope, 10 Wheaton, United States Supreme Court Reports, 1825. page 122 said: "No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged...of Nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights." the quarrels of Nations has proved itself often a successful and precious instrument to avoid war,...
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The Principles of American Diplomacy

John Bassett Moore - United States - 1918 - 476 pages
...thought was tersely phrased by Chief -Justice Marshall, in his celebrated affirmation: "No principle is more universally acknowledged than the perfect...of nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights." And as the Declaration of Independence proclaimed life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness to be...
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President Wilson's Foreign Policy: Messages, Addresses, Papers

United States. President (1913-1921 : Wilson) - United States - 1918 - 424 pages
...right to be lost? Each may renounce it for its own people; but can this renunciation affect others ? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality of nations. Eussia and Geneva have equal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully impose...
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The Equality of States in International Law

Edwin De Witt Dickinson - Equality of states - 1918 - 796 pages
...principle of general law is inore universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality of nations. F.ussia and Geneva have equal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully inpose a rule on .another. 7">-ch legislates for itself, but itr. legislation can operate on itself...
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The Question of Aborigines in the Law and Practice of Nations, Including a ...

Alpheus Henry Snow - Indigenous peoples - 1919 - 218 pages
...right to be lost? Each may renounce it for its own people; but how can this renunciation affect others? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all by the consent of all, can be divested only by consent; and this...
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Modern Political Tendencies and the Effect of the War Thereon

Theodore Elijah Burton - Political science - 1919 - 119 pages
...respect for smaller countries. So long ago as the year 1825, Chief Justice Marshall said in a decision, "No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged...of nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights." This may be regarded as a principle in our diplomacy maintained from the beginning. Not only is there...
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The United States of America: A Study in International Organization

James Brown Scott - Constitutional law - 1920 - 605 pages
...or for the coercion of arms. 1 Elliot, Debates, Vol. II, pp. 196-7. XIV THE ADMISSION OF NEW STATES No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged,...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all, by the consent of all, can be divested only by consent ; and...
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The Equality of States in International Law, Volume 3

Edwin De Witt Dickinson, Edwin DeWitt Dickinson - Law - 1920 - 424 pages
...right to be lost ? Each may renounce it for its own people; but can this renunciation affect others? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged,...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all by the consent of all, can be devested only by consent; and this...
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