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6. That upon the completion of the works for the interception and treatment of the sewage of the city, the sewage then discharging through the proposed outlet shall be diverted into the new system of intercepting sewers and sewage treatment works, and said outlet shall be abandoned or otherwise modified or rearranged in such manner as may be required or approved by the State Department of Health,

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Acting Deputy State Commissioner of Health April 30, 1917

CHAPPAQUA (Victor Guinzburg)

LIVSLY R. WILLIAMS, M.))., Acting State Ccrrmissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for sewage disposal for the property of Mr. Victor Guinzburg, located in the town of New Castle, Westchester county, about 2 miles southeast of Chappaqua, submitted to this Department for approval on February 1, 1917.

According to the plans the property of Mr. Guinzburg is located on the watershed of the Kensico reservoir. Although the report of the designing engineers submitted with the plans stated that “ below the disposal field the ground has a moderate and uniform slope and the nearest course is a small brook about 1,000 feet distant," the watercourse and ditches tributary to the brook were not shown by the plans and the designing engineers were accordingly asked to submit data as to the distance of the proposed disposal plant from the nearest perceptible line of drainage. Additional sketch plans showing the required data were received on February 28, 1917.

According to the report of the designing engineers the maximum population to be cared for is 8, with an average of 6. It is proposed to treat the sewage from this property in a sewage disposal plant consisting of a settling tank, dosing tank, gate chamber and subsurface irrigation system. The plant is located from 150 to 200 feet from the residence. The nearest stream tributary to the Kensico reservoir is a small brook from 500 to 800 feet from the disposal plant. It is stated by the report of the engineers that there is no ledge rock near the surface of the area selected for the disposal field and that the ground does not contain subsurface water at this point for a depth of at least 5 feet and that the surface of the ground does not show any indications of saturation or marshy conditions. The subsoil is said to be loam, slightly clayey in character with a porous top soil 6 to 8 inches thick.

Settling tank The settling tank which is to be covered with a brick dome provided with a manhole, is to be circular in plan, 7 feet in diameter and 312 feet deep below the flow line. It is to be provided with a submerged inlet and outlet, and a central battle wall having two side openings 9 inches wide each and from 2 feet to 3 feet 3 inches long. The settling tank has a capacity as designed of about 1,000 gallons and will, therefore, provide for a detentioir of the sewage of from 11 to 143 days, assuming a per capita rate of sewage contribution of 100 gallons per day. The tank is therefore of adequate capacity to care for the probable flow of sanitary sewage from this property. It should, however, be increased in depth to not less than 5 feet in order to allow greater depth for the storage of sludge. Inasmuch as the settling capacity is ample the diameter of the tank should be so decreased as to not increase the capacity of the tank when the depth is increased.

No provisions have apparently been made for the disposal of sludge from the settling tank. The sludge should be removed from the tank at least once a year and preferably two or three times a year. Rather than to attempt to dispose of it on a sludge drying bed, as is done in the case of larger plants, it would be better to bail or pump it into watertight containers in which it may be hauled away and disposed of by burial at some suitable point not less than 250 feet from any stream or perceptible line of drainage.

Dosing tank The dosing tank, which is also to be covered and provided with a manhole opening, is to be located adjacent to the settling tank. It is to be 5 feet 6 inches in diameter and 1 foot deep below the flow line and will have a capacity of about 180 gallons. The outlet of the dosing tank is to be connected with a discharge siphon to be placed in a small adjacent brick chamber from which the effluent is to be discharged through a 4-inch vitrified tile pipe to a gate chamber at the disposal plant. This chamber is to be so arranged as to permit of discharging the sewage into either of the 2 sections of the disposal field, thereby providing for periods of rest.

Subsurface irragation system

This system is to be divided into two sections and is to comprise 8 lines, 100 feet long each, of 8-inch tile of the horseshoe pattern. The tile are to be laid on nearly flat slopes at a depth of 18 inches below the surface and are to be placed on and surrounded with broken stone or gravel.

The disposal field covers an area of nearly 1/10 acre and will, therefore, be required to operate at from 6,000 to 8,000 gallons per acre per day, which is a very moderate rate of operation. The system also provides for from 100 to 133 feet of distributing tile per person served which is also a liberal allowance for a disposal system of this kind.

Conclusions and recommendations

From our careful examination of the plans it would appear that they meet the requirements of the rules and regulations for the protection from contamination of the water supply of New York city and that the proposed sewage disposal plant, if properly constructed and if maintained with care and efficiency should satisfactorily care for the sewage from the property. I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved on the following conditions:

1. That the depth of the settling tank below the flow line be increased to not less than 5 feet and that the diameter of the tank be so decreased as to give practically the same settling capacity as provided for by the plans.

2. That the sludge from the settling tank shall be properly buried at a distance of not less than 250 feet from the nearest stream or water

course or perceptible line of drainage. Inasmuch as the proposed disposal plant is to be situated on one of the watersheds of Kensico reservoir of the water supply of New York city, the Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity of New York city was notified on March 10, 1917, that plans for sewage disposal for this property had been submitted to this Department for approval and that our approval of the plans would be held in abeyance pending action by New York city in the matter. The designing engineers were also advised on the same date of the necessity of receiving the approval of these plans by the New York city Department of Water Supply, Gas and Electricity, as required by section 14 of the Rules and Regulations for the protection of the New York city water supply from contamination, enacted by the State Department of Health on February 1, 1917. Under date of March 26, 1917, we were advised by the city authorities that the plans for sewage disposal for the property of Mr. Victor Guinzburg near Chappaqua had been approved subject to their right of inspection during construction and operation.

Respectfully submitted,

THEODORE HORTON, ALBANY, N. Y., March 28, 1917

The plans were approved March 28, 1917.

CHEMUNG COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for sewage disposal for the Chemung County Tuberculosis Hospital submitted to this Department for approval on July 8, 1917.

The plans for sewage disposal for this hospital by means of sedimentation and subsurface irrigation were first submitted for approval on June 14, 1917, but it was found from our preliminary examination of them that they were not in satisfactory condition for approval nor did they contain sufficient data to permit of finally passing upon them. They were therefore returned on June 15 to the architects for the hospital with the recommendations that they be modified in a number of respects and that certain additional data be supplied as outlined in our letter under date of June 15, 1917.

The plans were revised in general accordance with our requirements and were resubmitted for approval on July 8. It appeared however from the data submitted with the plans that the soil at the site for the disposal plant which was said to consist of a "medium clay loam underlaid with clay and slightly mixed with gravel and loose shale” was not suitable or at least not well adapted to the proposed method of disposal by subsurface irrigation and the architects were accordingly requested to submit samples of the soil from the site of the proposed subsurface irrigation system collected 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 feet respectively below the surface of the ground. These samples were received on July 28 and show that the soil at the site is composed almost entirely of a heavy clay and disintegrated shale with very little if any sand or loam.

The proposed hospital site which comprises an area of about 12 acres is located on the side of a high hill about 38 mile west of the city of Elmira and about one mile north of the Chenango river. According to the report of the architects who prepared the plans of the hospital it appears that this institution will accommodate 22 patients and about 6 attendants at first and that the future population will probably never exceed 50 persons. The water supply is derived from a drilled well 268 feet deep located on high ground north of and some 125 feet from the hospital. The well is driven through 6 feet of surface soil, 36 feet of hard pan and boulders and the balance in flint and hard lime and sandstone, according to the report of the architects.

The plans for sewage disposal for the institution provide for a settling tank, dosing chamber and subsurface irrigation system and sludge drying bed for the disposal of sludge. The settling tank is 16 feet deep by 5 feet wide inside dimensions and 5 feet deep below the flow line. It will have a settling capacity of about 3,000 gallons and will therefore provide for about one day's detention of the sewage for the population provided for at first assuming a daily per capita flow at an average of 100 gallons.

The sludge from the settling tank is to be discharged by gravity flow to a sludge drying bed 20 feet square located about 250 feet east of the settling tank. The sludge pipe is to consist of 5-inch salt glazed pipe laid on a slope of about 5 per cent and having a hydraulic gradient of about 8 per cent. The report of the architects states that the sludge bed is to be located in the woods and that the sludge will be carried away.

I am of the opinion that the sludge pipe should be not less than 6 inches and preferably not less than 8 inches in size in order to prevent the clogging of this pipe. The sludge bed should also be filled to a depth of not less than 12 inches with sand which will act as a filtering material and facilitate the drying of the sludge.

The dosing tank which will have a capacity of about 700 gallons is to be located adjacent to the outlet end of the settling tank and is to be provided with an automatic discharge siphon by means of which the settled euent is to be discharged intermittently into the distribution system of the subsurface irrigation field. The subsurface irrigation system is to be located below the hospital and driveway leading to the institution at a distance of about 250 feet from the hospital building. It is divided into 2 beds of 3 sections each so arranged that either bed or any section may be thrown out of use for resting if necessary. Provisions are also made by the plans for the installation in the future of an additional subsurface irrigation field on the westerly side of the proposed fields shown in detail.

The two beds of the subsurface system to be constructed first will contain according to the plans 2,750' feet of distributing tiling equal to about 100 feet of tiling per person served for the institution as first constructed. Each section of the subsurface irrigation system is to contain 450 feet of 4 inch subsurface tiling laid with a slope of 1 inch in 50 feet. The lines of tiling according to the report of the architects are to be spaced 312 feet apart. They are to be laid in trenches filled with broken stone or coarse cinders and all joints of tiles are to be protected with tar paper.

The samples of soil from the disposal plant site show that it consists almost entirely of clay and shale with very little if any sand or loam and there can be no assurance that the subsurface irrigation system installed in soil of this kind will continue to operate successfully owing to the almost impervious nature of this soil as indicated by the samples submitted by the architects. As pointed out to the medical director of the Elmira Tuberculosis Hospital there are limitations to the applicability of subsurface irrigation plants for sewage disposal. Soils similar to that found at this site have been found to be absolutely unsuitable for this method of disposal and it would seem wise for the hospital to abandon the proposed scheine and to adopt some other method of disposal.

It appears, however, from a communication from the medical director referred to that he has had considerable experience in the disposal of sewage in soil such as that found at this site and that he is convinced that the proposed plant is more than ample for the purpose intended. I can see no objection therefore to permitting the institution to try to dispose of the sewage as provided for by the plans with the understanding that if the system should be found not to operate satisfactorily some other method of disposal of the sewage from the hospital be adopted. There are a number of ways in which the sewage could be satisfactorily disposed of with very little if any greater cost such as by extending the influent pipe from the proposed settling tank to and discharging the effluent from the tank into the Chemung river below the intake of the Elmira water supply or by extending the sewer from the hospital to and discharging the sewage into the city sewer system if arrangements could be made with the city for so doing.

In view of the above I would recommend that the plans be approved only on condition that the proposed subsurface irrigation system be extended when necessary in the future or that some other suitable method of disposal of the sewage of the hospital be provided should the proposed method of disposal be found to be inadequate.

Respectfully submitted,

THEODORE HORTON, ALBANY, N. Y., August 1, 1917

Chief Engineer

PERMIT

Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 76 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “ Public Health Law” as amended by chapter 558' of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the Chemung County Tuberculosis Hospital to discharge effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant into the ground waters tributary to the Chemung river within the town of Elmira in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such recovation, modification or change shall become necessary. way action by this Department on any future application that may be

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any made for permission to discharge additional sewage or eßluent into the waters of this State.

3. That the sewage disposal works shown by the plans approved this day shall be fully constructed in complete conformity with such plans or approved amendments thereof.

4. That only sanitary or domestic sewage and no storm water or surface water from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewage disposal works.

5. That no sewage sludge from any part of the sewage disposal works shall be discharged into the Chemung river or any other watercourse.

6. That when the population contributing sewage to the proposed sewage disposal works shall exceed 28 people the subsurface irrigation system shall be proportionately enlarged or extended in accordance with the approved plans.

7. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health satisfactory detailed plans for some other suitable method of disposal of the sewage of the Chemung County Tuberculosis Hospital shall be submitted to this Department for approval and that after the approval of said plans any or all portions of such means for sewage disposal shall be constructed and put in operation.

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health July 31, 1917

CLIFTON (Benson Mines Co.)

LINSLY R. WILLIAMS, M.D., Acting State Coninissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for the disposal of sewage from the proposed toilet room at the Benson Mines Company, Benson Mines, St. Lawrence county, submitted to this Department for approval on March 1, 1917.

These plans were first submitted for approval on February 15 and after a preliminary examination of them by the Engineering Division which showed that they did not contain sufficient data to permit of finally passing upon them, the plans were returned to the engineer for the company with the request that they be modified in certain respects and that additional data with respect to the basis of design, location, etc., be submitted. Our examination of the present plans show that they have been modified in general accordance with our suggestions.

The Benson Mines Company is located in the southern part of the town of Clifton near the junction of the N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R. and the Cranberry Lake R. R. The Little River, a tributary of the east branch of the Oswegatchie river, flows through the property of the mining company.

According to the plans and data submitted by the mining company the property comprises in addition to the plant at the mines, some 17 buildings occupied by the employees. The various buildings at the mines and those occupied by the employees are provided with a water supply. A hotel on the mine property near the railroad station and the buildings occupied by the employees together with a school and a store are provided with sewerage facilities. The sewage from the hotel is at the present discharged into the river at a point about 200 feet below the bridge crossing the river and the sewage from the company's houses occupied by the employees referred to discharges into the river on the opposite side of the stream about 100 feet below the bridge.

The plans now presented provide for the disposal of sewage from a new toilet room to be used by the employees at the mines. This toilet room is to contain 4 wash basins, 4 water closets and 2 trough urinals. The toilet room is to be used by from 18 to 80 men with an average of about 60. The sewage contribution is estimated at about 38 gallons per capita or a total flow of approximately 2,000 gallons per day.

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