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7. That the size of the drain holes in the float and mixing chambers and the lead outlet siphon shall be increased to not less than 2 inches in diameter except that reducing nipples may be provided if necessary.

8. That the manholes on the settling and dosing tanks shall be carried up level with the surface of the ground.

9. That the bottom of the dosing tank shall be raised not less than 12 feet.

M. NICOLL, JR., Acting Deputy State Commissioner of Health April 30, 1917

WATERTOWN

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for proposed sewers in the city of Watertown, Jefferson county, submitted to this Department for approval by the city engineer on behalf of the Board of Public Works, on December 29, 1916.

Plans for proposed sewers in Newell, Lepper and Howk streets were approved by this Department on November 20, 1916. These sewers were to be tributary to the Engine street outlet sewer. The plans now submitted show that it is proposed to modify somewhat the sewers in Howk and Lepper streets and the sewer in a portion of Newell street and provide for a new discharge into the Black river below the dam between Lepper and Howk streets. According to a communication received from the city engineer in reference to the plans it appears that in making the assessments for the construction of the proposed sewers as originally planned considerable opposition was made to their construction, not only by the property and factory owners on Newell street which are already provided with private sewers, but also from the property owners on Lepper and Howk streets on the grounds of the high cost of these sewers which would require considerable excavation in rock in their construction. It is claimed, however, that sewers, especially those in Howk and Lepper streets, are absolutely necessary inasmuch as sewage now flows on top of the ground and in the gutters from the houses on these streets. It is, therefore, planned to construct comparatively shallow sewers in Lepper and Howk streets and in a portion of Newell street between these streets and omit temporarily the extension of the Newell street sewer to the Engine street outlet.

The plans show that all of the proposed sewers are to be laid from 3 to 4 feet below the surface of the ground. They are all to be 8 inches in diameter. The proposed sewer in Howk street which is to be laid on a slope of 1.37 per cent is to be about 350 feet long. The sewer in Lepper street which is also to be about 350 feet long is to be laid with a slope of from 742 to 442 per cent. The greater portion of the sewer in Newell street is to have a slope of 3.04 per cent. Manholes are to be placed at the upper ends of the sewers in Howk street and Lepper street and also at the intersection of the sewers in these streets with the Newell street sewer. No manhole is shown, however, at the point of change of horizontal alignment of the Howk street sewer nor at the point of change of slope of the Lepper street sewer. A manhole or at least a lamp or inspection hole should be placed at each of these two points in order to facilitate the cleaning and inspection of these

sewers.

It appears from our examination of plans that although the proposed sewers which are to be laid from 3 to 5 feet higher than the sewers provided for by the original plans will, in all probability, not drain any fixtures placed in the cellar of the houses in that section, they should in other respects satisfactorily care for the sewage from the proposed sewers on these streets. There should, morcover, be no difficulty in intercepting the sewage tributary to these sewers by an intercepting sewer when such sewer is constructed owing to the relatively high elevation of the proposed sewers,

In view of the above I would recommend that the plans be approved and a permit be issued allowing the discharge of sewage from the proposed sewers into the Black river below the dam between Lepper and Howk

streets.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer

ALBANY, N. Y., January 19, 1917

PERMIT

Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 77 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “Public Health Law," as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the Board of Public Works of the city of Watertown to discharge sewage from the proposed sewer extensions in Newell, Lepper and Howk streets into the waters of Black river below that dam between Lepper and Howk streets within the municipality of Watertown in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to aifect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That only sanitary or domestic sewage, and no storm water or surface water from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewers.

LINSLY R. WILLAMS,

cliny Siate Commissioner of Health January 24, 1917

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for proposed' sewer extensions to be built in Magone street and vicinity in the city of Watertown, Jefferson county, N. Y., originally submitted to this Department for approval by the Board of Public Works of the city on September 25, 1917, and resubmitted with certain modifications and amendments on October 15, 1917.

The plans as now subinitted contemplate the construction of about 4,000 feet of 8 and 10-inch lateral sewers to be built in Magone street, Pollard street, Leach street and Boyer avenue in the city, and the construction of a 12-inch trunk sewer 1,200 feet long connecting these laterals to the North Side Trunk Sewer. Plans for the last-named sewer were approved by this Department on April 17, 1912.

Ail the laterals and trunk lines are to be laid without change in vertical or horizontal alignment between manholes, and have grades steep enough to produce satisfactory self-cleansing velocities if properly laid. Manholes are provided at all intersections, and in general intervals of not less than 400 feet on all lines. In no case does the distance between manholes exceed 550 feet. The 12-inch trunk line with its grade of 1.30 per cent has a capacity of a little over 1,000,000 gallons per 24 hours flowing half full, a figure somewhat in excess of the present requirement. The district, however, which may ultimately be drained to this trunk comprises about 150 acres, and it is estimated that the population of this district, including the employees in certain new shops, will within a short time, reach 6,000.

The proposed trunk line has ample capacity to serve this number of people.

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Besides the proposed sewers, the plans submitted show a 10-inch sewer on Hoard street and a 12-inch line on Starbuck avenue. Plans for an 8-inch line on the former street were approved by this Department on June 2, 1916. The size was later changed to 10-inch and the grade and alignment slightly modified. The engineer in his report states that through some oversight the plans for this alteration of the Hoard street sewer were not submitted to this Department for approval before the line was constructed. The line is laid on a satisfactory grade, and is of ample size to serve the district tributary to it. The Starbuck Avenue line was laid by the New York Air Brake Company in 1905, before Starbuck avenue became a city street, without the approval of this department. The sewer originally discharged into the ditch crossing Magone street near Trade court. When the Hoard Street sewer was constructed in 1916, the Starbuck Avenue line was connected to its upper extremity. The engineer in his report states that the map and profile of this line, as shown on the plans now submitted, were taken from the records of the New Air Brake Company, and that from personal examination of the sewer he believes the records to be substantially correct. The size, grade and alignment of the sewer are such that there appears to be no objection to the incorporation of this line in the general sewerage system of the city.

In view of the results of our examination of these plans and after careful consideration of the original features of the design, I beg to recommend that plaris be approved on condition that only sanitary or domestic sewage be permitted to enter the proposed sewers and the present sewers on Starbuck avenue and Hoard street; and that a permit be granted for the discharge of the sewage from these lines into the Black river through the present sewer outlet near the mouth of Cowens creck,

Respectfully submitted,

THEODORE HORTON, ALBANY, N. Y., October 18, 1917

Chief Engineer

PERMIT Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 77 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the " Public Health Law," as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the board of public works of the city of Watertown to discharge sewage from the proposed sewers in Magone, Chaffee, Pollard and Leach streets, and in Boyer and Starbuck avenues into the waters of the Black river near the mouth of Cowens creek, within the municipality of Watertown, in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That only sanitary or domestic sewage and no storm water or surface water from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewers.

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health Ootober 22, 1917

WEBB (O. M. Eidlitz)

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of the plans for gewage disposal for the camp of Mr. O. M. Eidlitz on Fourth lake, Herkimer county, N. Y. submitted to this Department for approval on October 2, 1917.

According to the report of the designing engineer, the camp is located on the north shore of Fourth lake. It is stated that the regular population to be cared for is 6 persons and the daily water consumption is estimated at 25 gallons per capita.

Sewage disposal It is proposed to treat sewage from the camp in a sewage disposal plant consisting of a double compartment settling tank and a dosing tank. "The effluent from the dosing tank is to be discharged through a 6-inch tile sewer into Fourth lake.

Settling tank The sewage from the camp is to be conveyed to the settling tank through a 5-inch sewer. This tank, which is to be rectangular in plan, consists of two compartments. The first compartment is 5 feet wide, 6 feet long and has a depth of 372 feet below the flow line, giving a capacity of 105 cubic feet. The sewage from this compartment will flow into the second compartment through an open brick work section 1 foot, 6 inches high, extending the width of the tank. The bricks are to be laid on end and have a horizontal space of 1 inch between them, A 4-inch concrete wall i foot, 6 inches high will serve as a foundation for the brick work and will keep the sludge from getting into the second compartment. From the top of the brick work the concrete wall will extend to the cover of the tank. The second compartment is to be 3 feet, 4 inches long, 5 feet wide and have a depth of 3 feet, 6 inches below the flow line, giving a capacity of 58 cubic feet. The total capacity of the two compartments would, therefore, be 163 feet or about 1,200 gallons. This should give the sewage a detention period in the tanks equal to 2 days' flow on the usual basis of design of 100 gallons per capita. Although the settling tank appears to have ample capacity to care for the probable flow of sanitary sewage, tributary to it, its depth should be increased to not less than 4 feet below the flow line, and its width should be so decreased as not to increase its capacity. It appears from the examination of the plans that the settling tanks and dosing tank have no venting. They should be properly vented by some such means as the providing of perforated manhole covers or a vent pipe extending upward along a building or tree. A baffle should also be placed in front of and about 12 inches from the inlet pipe of the first compartment of the tank.

Dosing tank The sewage from the second compartment of the settling tank flows in a dosing tank 5 feet long, 5 feet wide having a depth of 1 foot, 10 inches below flow line, giving a capacity of about 46 cubic feet. This tank is to be connected with a Miller siphon by means of which the sewage may be discharged through a 6-inch tile drain into the lake. The outlet end of the tile drain should be submerged below the low-water mark.

Conclusions and recommendations

From a further careful examination of the plans, it is found that although the proposed sewage disposal plant has been designed to meet the local requirements, there are certain modifications, as noted above, which should be made in the construction of the plant in order not only to increase the efficiency, but also to reduce the work and cost of maintenance.

I, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued for the discharge of effluent from the proposed sewage disposal plant into Fourth lake on the following conditions:

1. That the depth of the settling tank be increased to not less than 4 feet below the flow line and the width so decreased as not to increase the capacity of the tank.

2. That the settling tank and dosing tank be properly vented.

3. That a baffle be placed in front and 12 inches from the inlet pipe in the settling tank.

4. That the outlet end of the effluent pipe be submerged below the low-water mark,

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y., October 9, 1917

PERMIT

Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 76 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “Public Health Law," as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to 0. M. Eidlitz to discharge effluent from the proposed settling tank to treat the sewage from his camp on Fourth lake, into the waters of Fourth lake near said camp, within the town of Webb, in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That the sewage disposal works shown by plans approved this day shall be fully constructed in complete conformity with such plans or approved amendments thereof, except as provided in conditions 6, 7, 8 and 9 of this permit.

4. That only sanitary or domestic sewage and no storm water or surface water from grounds, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed settling tank.

5. That no sewage sludge from any part of the disposal works shall be discharged into fourth lake or any other watercourse or body of water.

6. That the depth of the settling tank shall be increased to not less than four (4) feet below the flow line and the width so decreased as not to increase the capacity of the tank.

7. That the settling tank shall be properly vented.

8. That a baffle shall be placed 12 inches in front of the inlet to the settling tank.

9. That the effluent pipe from the settling tank shall be extended into Fourth lake in such a manner as to be submerged at low water stage.

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health October ll, 1917

WHITE PLAINS (Gedney Way Station) HERMANN M. Biggs, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on an examination of plans for sewage disposal for the Gedney Way Station of the New York, Westchester and Boston Railway Company, near White Plains, Westchester county, submitted to this Department for approval by the Engineer of Maintenance on behalf of the company, on November 16, 1917.

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