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CONTENTS.

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MEMOIR, .............

POEMS, . .. ... . . ... ... ... . .. ... ... .. ....... 27

ORIENTAL ECLOGUES.

Eclogue I. Selim ; or, the Shepherd's Moral, . . . . . . . . .. . . .

Eclogue II. Hassan ; or, the Camel-driver, ..............

Eclogue III. Abra ; or, the Georgian Sultana. .

Eclogue IV. Agib and Secander ; or, the Fugitives, ..........

ODES.

Ode to Pity, .....................

Ode to Fear,

. . . . . .. ... 45

Ode to Simplicity, . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ..

. . . . . . . . . 47

Ode on the Poetical Character, .............

Ode, written in the Beginning of the Year 1746, . .....

Ode to Mercy, ............................... 53

Ode to Liberty, .............................

Ode to a Lady, on the Death of Colonel Ross, in the Action of Fontenoy,

Ode to Evening, ..............................

Ode to Peace, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The Manners, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

The Passions, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

... 67

Ode on the Death of Thomson, .......................

Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the Highlands of Scotland, . ........

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.

An Epistle, addressed to Sir Thomas Hanmer, on his Edition of Shakspeare's

Works, ................................83

Dirge in Cymbeline, sung by Guiderus and Arviragus over Fidele, supposed to

be dead, ............................... 88

Verses written on a Paper which contained a piece of Bride-cake, given to the

Author by a Lady, .................

To Miss Aurelia C r, on her weeping at her Sister's Wedding, ........ 90

Sonnet, .................................. 91

Song, ............. .... ... ..............91

NOTES, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95

LIFE OF COLLINS.

William COLLINS was born at Chichester, in Sussex, on the 25th of December, 1721. His father was a respectable tradesman, and at that time Mayor of his native city. The maiden name of his mother was Elizabeth Martin. His parents intended to educate him for the church, and, with this design, sent him, in 1733, to Win-. chester College, where he was placed under the care of Dr. Burton. Here he remained for seven years. Here, many years afterwards, Sir Egerton Brydges saw his name written on a window-pane in his own hand; and so few are the personal memorials left of the poet, that this fact was thought of sufficient interest to record. Among his school-fellows was Joseph Warton, with whom he formed an intimacy that continued through life. While school-boys, they wrote poems which were published in the columns of the Gentleman's Magazine, where Collins's first printed production appeared in January, 1739. Another trifle of his appeared in the same journal in the October following, which is now inserted among his poems. This was sent by Collins, under the signature of Delieatulus, to the publisher, Edward Cave, Jr., at St. John's Gate, in a letter, with two other pieces from Winchester, - Sappho's Advice, by Monitorius, his friend Warton; Beauty and Innocence, by Tomkyns, as Auramantulus. At that time Johnson was Mr. Cave's reliable man for editorial aid in the Magazine, and in the following month there is a notice of the contents of the October number, said to be from his pen. It is curious enough, as containing, probably, the first word of encouragement Collins received, and the kindest that was ever spoken of him while

he was in a situation to be moved by praise or censure. “We pass on," says Johnson, “ to three more (poems) of the lyric kind, which might do honor to any collection. There belongs to them a happy facility of versification, and the way to the scope, or the striking part, is natural and well conducted. Whoever ventures to prefer one, must allow the other two worthy of the same hand. The least,

Collins's] which is a favorite of mine, carries a force mixed with tenderness, and an uncommon elevation."

Whilst at school Collins wrote the Oriental Eclogues (which were not published till after he went to Oxford), and distinguished himself by his proficiency in English composition. To the studies of the school he must have devoted himself with diligence, for, in consideration of his merit, he came off from Winchester first on the roll, where Joseph Warton, who afterwards acquired so much distinction as a scholar and man of letters, was second. In 1740 he was entitled to fill the first vacancy at New College, but, none occurring, he was entered a commoner of Queen's, where he remained till he was elected a demy, or scholar of Magdalen, in July, 1741.

During his residence at Magdalen, it happened, one afternoon, at a tea visit, that several of his college friends were assembled at his rooms to enjoy each other's conversation, when entered Hampton, afterwards the translator of Polybius, as remarkable at that time for his brutal disposition as for his good scholarship, and, being determined to quarrel, lifted up his foot, and kicked the tea-table, and all its contents, to the other side of the room. Collins, though of a warm temper, was so confounded at the unexpected downfall, and so astonished at the unmerited insult, that he took no notice of the aggressor; but, getting up from his chair calmly, he began picking up the slices of bread and butter, and the fragments of his china, repeating, very mildly,

“Invenias etiam disjecti membra poetæ.” An academic career, however, had no attraction for Collins. Its discipline was irksome, and its studies failed to excite or interest him. But it was during his residence at Oxford that he published his Eclogues, under the title of Persian Eclogues, and his verses to Sir Thomas Hanmer on his edition of Shakspeare. To neither of these

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