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By a certificate, dated April 27, 1891, filed in the office of the secretary of state, April 28, 1891, the route was extended as follows:

Beginning from its existing road in Greenpoint avenue near Borđen avenue; running thence along Greenpoint avenue as provided in chap. 128, L. 1873 (the original charter of The Long Island City and Maspeth Railway Company) to the boundary line between Long Island City and Newton; continuing thence on Greenpoint avenue to its terminus; thence across the road at its terminus to Fifth street and Fourth street; also from Greenpoint avenue along Betts avenue, and on Woodside avenue to Fifth and Fourth streets; thence along Fifth street and Fourth street to Jackson avenue; thence along Jackson avenue easterly to Flushing avenue; thence along the road leading from that point, whether known as Jackson avenue or Flushing avenue north of the adjacent railroad to the town of Flushing; also from the intersection of Jackson and Flushing avenues westerly along Flushing avenue to the Long Island City line; also on Jackson avenue from Fourth street to Fifth street, and thence to the Long Island City line; also from Jackson avenue along the Bowery road to Bowery Bay.

By a certificate, dated February 12, 1895, and filed in the office of the secretary of state, Febuary 13, 1895, a final extension of the road was made as follows:

Commencing at its tracks in Borden avenue, at or near Vernon avenue, and running thence with double tracks along Vernon avenue, Flushing street and Front street, to connect with its tracks in Borden avenue and Front street.

Map. September 15, 1886, the Company filed in the office of the clerk of Queens County a map of its extension from Maurice avenue to Grand street.

Special franchises. By resolution of the common council of Long Island City, passed May 12, 1885, approved by the mayor May 25, 1885, consent was given to the company to extend its route as described in the certificate of extension dated June 25, 1885, and filed in the office of the secretary of state, March 22, 1886.

By resolution of the highway commissioners of the town of Newtown, adopted March 18, 1886, the consent of the town authorities was granted to the construction of the extension as described in the certificate of extension, filed with the secretary of state, March 22, 1886. The conditions upon which this grant was given were that the company was to lower the grade of certain streets, operate its railroad by horse power or other motive power,

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as in the judgment of the commissioners of highways for the time-being should be considered proper and consistent with the public interest, and that the rails on portions of its road be similar to those used by The Grand Street and Newtown Railroad Company on its road.

By resolution of the highway commissioners of the town of Newtown, adopted March 26, 1889, consent was given to the construction of the extension of route as described in the certificate filed by the Company in the office of the secretary of state, February 21, 1889, so far as the streets and avenues of the town of Newtown were affected; and further, to the construction of a railroad " on so much of Hunter's Point avenue, Borden avenue and the old road from Penny Bridge to the village of Newtown,” as are situated in the town of Newtown. In this resolution the highway commissioners also consented to the use of “cable traction power" or the use of electric motive power, either from storage batteries carried on the cars or from proper conductors suspended from the poles, on the railroad constructed or to be constructed.

The so called extension, as described in the certificate filed in the office of the secretary of state, February 21, 1889, was in reality merely a change of route as contained in the franchise of March 18, 1886, so as to make the line run through private property from the intersection of Elmweir and Maurice avenues by a direct route to the northerly side of Grand street, nearly opposite Juniper avenue.

By resolution of the common council of Long Island City, dated May 5, 1891, the consent of the local authorities was given to the extension of route as described in the certificate filed in the secretary of state's office March 23, 1891; the railroad in this instance to be operated by electricity.

By resolution of the highway commissioners of the town of Newtown, dated April 29, 1891, consent was given to the construction of the extension as described in the certificate filed in the secretary of state's office April 28, 1891. There is a slight change in description in the franchise from that in the certificate of extension, in that the franchise describes the connection with the road leading from the intersection of Jackson and Flushing avenues as “the road leading from that point, whether known as Jackson avenue or Flushing avenue or Flushing causeway, or by any other name.”

By resolution of the common council of Long Island City, adopted July 18, 1895, consent was given for the construction of the extension as described in the certificate filed in the secre tary of state's office, February 13, 1895, upon condition that the Company commence construction of the extension within one year after the consent of property owners had been obtained, or in lieu thereof, the consent of the appellate division had been given, and that the construction of the road be completed within three years after the same date, unless the time should be extended.

Change of motive power. September 29, 1890, by order of the Railroad Commission, the Company was authorized to change its motive power from horses to the overhead electric trolley system, on conditions as follows:

(1) Rate of speed to be fixed by municipal authorities of Long Island City; (2) poles to be approved by the local authorities of Long Island City and town of Newtown; (3) no car to be run with less than two men in charge, or if two cars are operated together with less than three men in charge; (4) reasonable precautions must be taken to prevent currents from the Company's wires from interfering with the currents upon the wires of telegraph, telephone or other companies; (5) the Company must provide insulated shears at convenient points designated by the local authorities with which to cut its wires in case of fire; (6) the Company must conform to reasonable requirements of the local authorities relative to the removal of snow and ice, the paving of streets, etc.

s. In 1883, the capital stock paid in was $100,000 and the funded debt $75,000. At this time the Company charged a seven cent fare for through passengers on its leased lines between Astoria and Bowery Bay, and a five-cent fare on its owned line between Long Island City and Calvary cemetery. In 1885 the amount of capital stock issued was given as $150,000, of which $50,000 had been issued on account of construction, and $100,000 for cash. In 1893 it appears that the Company's outstanding capital stock had been increased from $150,000 to $150,700.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart III, no. 9.) In 1883, the Company was operating under lease the roads of The Astoria

and Hunter's Point Railroad Company and the Steinway Avenue and Bowery Bay Railroad Company, which, up to the time of consolidation had been operated for several years by Patrick J. Gleason, president of the Long Island City and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company. The lease of these two companies was abrogated October 31, 1884.

May 9, 1896, the property and franchises of the Company were sold to William R. Heath, under proceedings to foreclose a mortgage dated July 1, 1887. In the deed to Heath the property is described in great detail, and appears to include everything in the nature of a franchise or railroad belonging to the Company, with the express exception that no land, road, right of way or franchise to build or operate a railroad from Laurel Hill through and along the Shell road to Winfield, given to the Long Island City and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company by chapter 681, laws of 1871, or any railroad built on this route excepted, is included. By deed, dated May 9, 1897, all of the property and franchises of the company, not excepting the Winfield extension, were conveyed to William R. Heath under proceedings for the foreclosure of a second mortgage, dated January 2, 1893.

June 29, 1896, William R. Heath and wife transferred the property and franchises of the Company to the New York & Queens County Railway Company (no. 440) in exchange for $760,000 of the latter company's capital stock, and $2,000,000 of its first mortgage, five per cent, 50 year gold bonds.

Construction and operation. In 1884, it appears that the Company was charging for through passengers from Long Island City to Calvary cemetery five and ten cents, and for way passengers between Astoria and Hunter's Point, between Long Island City and Astoria, and between Hunter's Point and Bowery Bay, five cents.

In 1886 it appears that the Company was operating only one line of road from Long Island City to Laurel Hill, the rate of fare charged on week days being five cents, and on Sundey 10 cents. In 1890 the constructed road is described as extending from Long Island City to the Lutheran cemetery, a distance of 4.5 miles, with a second track over 2.25 miles of the distance.

335 The Long Island City and Sea Beach Railroad Company

(Brooklyn and Queens) Incorporation. March 13, 1886; General Railroad Law of 1850; for purpose of constructing a railroad in Queens and Kings Counties; corporate life, 999 years; capital stock, $1,000,000; route (about 19 miles) as follows:

Commencing at or near Long Island City, and running thence by the most direct and feasible route by way of the city of Brooklyn, to a point at or near the village of Fort Hamilton; also a branch line from a point in or near the town of Flatbush to a point in or near the village of Canarsie.

Stock. The Company's report for 1886, stated the amount of capital stock paid in as $1,920.

Construction. There is no record of any construction. The company has probably forfeited its corporate existence.

336 The Long Island City Shore Railroad Company

(Queens) Incorporation. June 1, 1874; chapter 221, laws of 1874, and General Railroad Law of 1850; for purpose of building a horse railroad in Long Island City; corporate life, 100 years; capital stock, $75,000; route (about 31/2 miles), as follows:

Commencing at the eastern boundary of the land owned by the East River Ferry Company, and running thence through Borden avenue (formerly Ferry street), Vernon avenue (formerly Central avenue), the Boulevard (formerly Sunswick terrace) and Fulton avenue (formerly Fulton street) to the 92d street ferry in Long Island City.

In the Act of 1874, Henry G. Sillick, Jr. and fourteen others were named as the grantees of a franchise to build a double or single track horse railroad for the conveyance of passengers along the route as described in the preceding paragraph, and also through and along such other streets and avenues in the fourth ward of said Long Island City as the common council might permit. Authority to build such road was given upon condition that the consents of the owners of two-thirds in value of the property fronting on the streets and avenues through which the road was to be constructed, should be obtained ; that a fare not to exceed six cents for the conveyance of passengers along the route should be charged; that the grantees and their associates should within one month after the passage of the act, organize their corporation,

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