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By deed, dated April 28, 1887, the railroad of the Whitestone and Westchester Railroad Company (no. 714) was acquired from John Rogers Maxwell and wife, and Henry Graves and wife, who had acquired it under foreclosure proceedings by deed, dated May 27, 1886. The road acquired by this purchase extended from Whitestone to Whitestone Landing. The consideration appears to have been $109,306.81.

April 2, 1889, by a certificate filed in the office of the secretary of state, the company became merged into The Long Island Railroad Company (no. 341) by surrender of the entire capital stock.

332 The Long Island City and Manhattan Beach

Railroad Company

(Queens) Incorporation. February 24, 1883; General Railroad Law of 1850; for purpose of constructing a railroad from a point of junction with the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad, near Fresh Pond, to a point of junction with the Brooklyn and Rockway Beach Railroad; corporate life, 1,000 years; capital stock, $50,000; route (about two miles).

Map. February 28, 1883, the Company filed in the office of the county clerk of Queens County a map of its route from a connection with the Brooklyn and Rockaway Beach Railroad at the cemetery of the Evergreens to a connection with the Brooklyn and Montauk Railroad, 2,137 feet west of the east end of Fresh Pond station.

Stock.

In 1883 it was reported that the amount of capital stock subscribed was $42,300, and the amount paid in, $8,600.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart V, no. 8.) The Company was organized in the interest of The Long Island Railroad Company, that company advancing money for construction of the road, upon agreement that the stock should be issued to The Long Island Railroad Company in sufficient amount to pay for the cost of construction.

August 27, 1885, by an agreement of consolidation filed in the office of the secretary of state, the Company was consolidated with The New York and Manhattan Beach Railway Company, and The New York, Bay Ridge and Jamaica Railroad Company to form The New York, Brooklyn and Manhattan Beach Railway

Company (no. 465), which is still in existence as a subsidiary and lessor company of the Long Island Railroad system.

Construction and operation. Since the completion of the road The Long Island Railroad Company has operated it. In 1883, the length of the road was given as 1.457 miles, but the date of opening, which must have been some time between February 24, 1883, and September 30, 1883, was not indicated.

333 The Long Island City and Maspeth Railway Company

(Queens) Incorporation. March 25, 1873; chapter 128, laws of 1873; for purpose of constructing a single or double track horse railroad in Long Island City and Newtown; corporate life, not stated; capital stock, $100,000, which may be increased to $200,000; route, as follows:

Commencing at the 34th street ferry in Long Island City, and running thence upon Ferry streets (now Borden avenue) and through East Second street (now Borden avenue) and its continuation to D street; thence through D street to Greenpoint and Hunter's Point avenues, either or both of them, to the City line; thence over Newtown, Debevoise and South avenues, or some other avenues adjacent thereto, and not over 1,500 feet therefrom, to the Newtown and Maspeth road; thence over Maspeth road and Juniper avenue to the Lutheran cemetery.

Under the act the Company was authorized to run upon, intersect or use any portion of other railroad tracks then laid upon any part of its route as indicated, and in case of disagreement re specting compensation, the matter was to be determined in the manner provided in section 28, of the Railroad Law of 1850. The Company was not, however, to construct any tracks through a street in which there were already two tracks in operation. The right of condemnation of real estate was given. The track was to be laid of such rails as to least obstruct the free passage of vehicles. The surface of the roadway inside the rails and for one foot on either side was to be kept in repair by the company. The construction of the road was to be commenced within one year and to be completed within three years from the date of the act incorporating the Company.

Special franchises. By chapter 224, laws of 1881, the Company was authorized “not to build ” upon the following portion of its road:

On D street (now Bradley avenue) from East Second street (now Borden avenue) to Greenpoint avenue, and on Greenpoint avenue from said D street to Hunter's Point avenue, and on Hunter's Point avenue to said East Second street.

Intercorporate relations. (See also chart III, no. 6.) By an act of the legislature, passed June 2, 1883, chapter 504, laws of 1883, the company was authorized to consolidate with the Long Island City and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company, under chapter 917, laws of 1869. It was also provided that the new company should have authority to borrow money for the purpose of furnishing or equipping the railroad of its constituent corporations, or either of them. Consolidation was effected by an agreement, dated June 23, 1883, filed in the office of the secretary of state August 28, 1883, forming the Long Island City and Newtown Rail Road Company (no. 334).

Construction. At the time of consolidation (1883) it seems doubtful whether the Company had actually constructed any portion of its road. The Company's route from the 34th street ferry to the intersection

the intersection of Bradley and Greenpoint avenues was identical with the route of the Long Island City and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company. This portion of the road was constructed prior to consolidation, undoubtedly by the Long Island City and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company. The portions of the route on Greenpoint avenue from Borden avenue to Hunter's Point avenue, and from Hunter's Point avenue on to the City line (if the original franchise is to be interpreted as covering this portion of Greenpoint avenue); on Hunter's Point avenue from Greenpoint avenue to Borden avenue; on Debevoise avenue from Newtown avenue to South avenue; on South avenue from Debevoise avenue to Grand street (Newtown and Maspeth road); on Grand street from South avenue to Maspeth at Juniper avenue, were never constructed by this Company or its successors. A portion of the Company's route now constitutes a portion of the Calvary line of the New York and Queens County Railway Company.

334 Long Island City and Newtown Rail Road Company

(Queens) Incorporation. August 28, 1883; chapter 504, laws of 1883; as a consolidation of the Long Island City and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company (no. 330), and The Long Island City and Maspeth Railway Company (no. 333). The route was identical with the routes of the constituent companies; corporate life, not stated; capital stock, $160,000; of which $60,000 was to go to the stockholders of the Long Island City and Calvary Cemetery Railroad Company, and $100,000 to the stockholders of The Long Island City and Maspeth Railway Company; route, about 10 miles; road to be constructed and operated as a double-track horse railroad.

Extensions of route. By a certificate executed June 25, 1885, filed in the office of the secretary of state, March 22, 1886, the company extended its route as follows:

Beginning at its present road on Borden avenue, at the northerly end thereof, and thence running along Front street about 200 feet to Third street, and thence southerly along Third street 300 feet, all in Long Island City.

The extension was to be a double track railroad about 500 feet in length.

By a certificate executed, February 1, 1886, filed in the office of the secretary of state, March 22, 1886, another extension was made as follows:

Beginning at the junction of Debevoise avenue and the old road from Penny bridge to the village of Newtown (sometimes called the Newtown road) in the town of Newtown and the county of Queens, and running thence easterly along said old road and Elweir avenue, so called, to Maurice avenue; thence on a route, the center line of which is a straight line beginning at the center of Elweir avenue on the westerly side of Maurice avenue, and thence extending in a straight line southeasterly across property formerly of James Maurice, now deceased, and property of the trustees of the estate belonging to the diocese of Long Island and other property to a point on Hamilton place in the said town of Newtown, distant measured along the side of Hamilton place 62 feet southerly from Hull avenue; thence through and along Hamilton place to Grand street (formerly the Newtown and Maspeth plankroad); thence through and along Grand street to Juniper avenue; thence through and along Juniper avenue to Metropolitan avenue at Middle Village, all in the town of Newtown; also beginning at the junction of Bradley avenue and Borden avenue (so called), now unopened, in Long Island City; thence through and along Borden avenue (unopened) as it is laid down on the map of said Long Island City to its easterly termination at or near Hunter's Point avenue and the City line, all in said city.

By certificate, dated February 18, 1889, filed in the office of the secretary of state, February 21, 1889, the route was extended as follows:

Beginning at a point in the old road leading from Penny bridge to the village of Newtown (sometimes called the Newtown road or avenue) at the junction of Debevoise avenue in the town of Newtown and county of Queens, and running thence easterly along the northerly side of said old Newtown road or avenue and Elweir avenue to and across Maurice avenue to a point on the easterly line thereof, distant 15 feet southerly across said Maurice avenue; and running thence on the same course south 51 degrees 34 minutes east, crossing land of the estate of James Maurice, deceased, and land of the trustees of the estate belonging to the diocese of Long Island, and across land of the estate of John Frost, deceased, land of the estate of Charles G. Covert, deceased, and again land of the trustees of the estate belonging to the diocese of Long Island to the estate of James Maurice, deceased, and lots numbers 29, 30, 31 and 32 on Block L on the Van Mater map of property situated in the village of Maspeth, said map being on file in the clerk's office for the county of Queens about 1,695 feet; thence on a curve to the left, which curve has a radius of about 288 feet 712 inches, crossing parts of the above-mentioned lots to and across Hull avenue and Hamilton place, and across lot number 30, Block M on the aforementioned map 161 feet 934 inches to a point in Hamilton place about l foot 9 inches westerly from the easterly side thereof; thence on a course south 83 degrees 31 minutes east to and across lots numbers 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 16, 25, 26, 27, 28, 1 and 2, Block Y on said map, and crossing Columbia avenue at or near its junction with Clinton avenue, and then across lots numbers 48, 47, 46, 45, 44, 43, 42, 41, 40, 10, 11 and 12 in Block S on said map about 578 feet and three-quarters of an inch; thence on a curve to the right, which curve has a radius of 282 feet 734 inches, crossing lots numbers 13, 14, 15 and 16 on Block S on the map aforesaid, about 148 feet 7 inches to a point in Perry avenue about 37 feet 51/2 inches from the southerly side of said Perry avenue, thence south 52 degrees 58 minutes east, crossing said Perry avenue and land now or late of Christ D. Relm, and crossing Fisk avenue about 312 feet, to a point in Grand street (formerly the Newtown and Maspeth plank road) about 6 feet south of the centre thereof; thence on a curve to the right, which curve has a radius of 136 feet 9 inches, crossing Grand street about 113 feet 1 inch to a point in Juniper avenue 20 feet distant from the easterly side thereof; thence through and along Juniper avenue on the easterly side thereof to Metropolitan avenue at Middle Village, all in the county and town aforesaid.

By a certificate, dated March 11, 1891, filed in the office of the secretary of state March 23, 1891, the route was again extended as follows:

Beginning at its present road on Borden avenue, at West avenue, and running thence along West avenue to Third street about 200 feet; thence northerly along Third street about 485 feet to Front street, all in Long Island City and county of Queens. The road was to be a double track railroad.

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