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North-West Passage proved by Whales-
Whales which have been harpooned in
Greenland seas, have been found in the Paci
Ocean; and whales, with some lances stic
ing in their feet (a kind of weapon used
no nation now known), have been cau
both in the sea of Spitzbergen and in Da
Strait. The following is one of the aut
rities for this fact, which, of all other
ments yet offered in favour of a transi
passage, seems to be the most satisfacto

A Dutch East India captain, of the 1
of Jacob Cool, of Sardam, who liad
several times at Greenland, and wa
course, well acquainted with the natu
the apparatus used in the whale-fishery
informed by the Fischal Zeeman, of
that in the sea of Tartary, there was a
taken, in the back of which was stie!
Dutch harpoon, marked with the
W. B. This curious circumstance wa
municated to Peter Jansz Vischer, pi
a Greenland whaler, who discovered 1
harpoon in question had belonged to
Bastiaanz, Admiral of the Dutch Gr
feet, and had been struck into the
the Spitzbergen sea.-Beschryving
visvangst.

Insects in a Mummy.-M. Figeac
noble, while examining an Egyptian
found amongst its fingers several a
opterous insects of a fine rose colo
its brilliancy. M. Jurine, of Gener
tained that they belonged to a no
species of corynetes (fabricius), w

Circı
disposed to call C. Glaber.
indicate that the eggs of those ins
laid on the mummy during the e
process, and subsequently becary
insects. The Arabs, indeed, had <
mummy; but the envelope of t
where the insects were found,
touched.

Coral Reefs. It has been ger
lieved that the deep perpendicular
near to which the sounding-lin
bottom, consist wholly of coral;
Quoy and Gaimard have adduced
factory reasons to prore that the
far from raising from the depths
perpendicular walls, form only
crests of a few fathoms' thickn

the most considerable ban

and deep openings, CON

F

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lentina Vemme-Vest Nehe, w! CELECT 10 Ft four of M*** its fir.mp3 ils hr.", Dok. V Jarine, a brdura arte I.IN ! thar besneed to in Met nan netes Cabinet,

. to call (. Olaber. din! Tindle that thrers of three ineris" poress, and sutaupuestr keridep he shadow of the Dary, none equal Mr. Palmer's, for that gen11 wris. The Arabs, irdeerd, ba! ma'lmmr', but the corekape of the there the inscris were lund, ros liered that the deep perperduur reefs, of a middling size. Sun, to be absolutely no other than a body

(oral Reefs. It has been gererar red with a smooth monstrating (!) our great orb of light, the near to which the sounding-line ends me hotlom, consist wholly of coral; but M. Voy and Gaimard bare adduced rerr satis perpendicular walls, form only layers o les in length, and ture, awakening moral industry and sagatar from raising from the depths of the ocean bases to about an rusts of a few fathoms' thickness. They pod the lana, or city, and employing, as it were, a new capital tark that the species, which alwars cop 21

t considerable banks, require all the flamentous
light to perfect them; and me
that all those steep walls, prout of a reddish
quatorial seas, are inter bevis

ber the coachman, from cast. This wool is much more soft and de-
i a smack like a whip; licate to the touch than cotton, and the fila-
d, from its voice being men's so very tender and fine, that the pa-
pell; and so on. There tives here think that it cannot be spun; bot

season, exactly resem- I am persuaded that this is entirely owing to ad.

their ignorance, and, if a method be ever "-Around Gibraltar is discovered of spinping it, its fineness will enI great numbers. These title it rather to be called ceibo silk than of warming themselves wool. The only use they have hitherto aphe soldiers have boiled plied it to is to fill mattresses; and in this Ithouglı chips of wood particular it must be allowed to have no he apes never think of equal.- Ulloa's Travels.

Early Rising:-We have marked taverns -In a scarce treatise, and grog-shops, and found them sooner terum," by Portius, it is nanted than any other places of resort-and eyes the interior mem- noticed that a drunkard always commences adantly provided with his career early in the day. Look where : thence more sensible you will, and, our life on it, you see a drunkto That sort of eyes ard spend no morning in bed unless comthe north during their pelled to do so by last night's debauch. They the deep black of the awake with the first ray of the morning ort the vivacity of the light, their minds clouded with horror for he Laplander's eyes, past conduct, their throats burning with an its the light reflected unnatural thirst, and they hasten to quench iders them subject to the one by adding to the other. These pco

ple had better let the sun rise upon their ,-Charles Domery, slumbers than take another step towards a a prisoner of war at horrid death before breakfast. And yet anin one day, sixteen other class get and deserve no credit for 1, four pounds of raw leaving their beds before their neighbours; Is of raw beef, two and these are those who make po good use 's, besides drinking of their time after they are up. What matnd, although he was ters if a man have all the good qualities in i of ten men, he was the world if he makes no good use of them? ear be ate 174 cats Would the mines of Peru benefit the world

if suffered to remain in the heart of her -There are marks of mountains ? A man may get up if he will, east they have been and spend more time on his feet than any in however, these are the country, and yet not perform half the

If a cucumber be labour of one who indulges himself in bed ranches sloot there till noon. We have heard of a clever old e way of either of Jady, who was always the first person up in rn off and avoid it, the place, and yet worth nothing after she tone, describing a

was up. having passed it, it The Sun a Body of Ice.—Many opinions ne. This, which is have been formed concerning the sun, wbich

perception, is only philosophers have sometimes ridiculer, and jy which plants al- sometimes seriously refuted. But of all the or the plant turns paradoxical assertions respecting that lumi

tleman positively asserts it to be a body of de ceibo, or ceibo ice! The following is the title of Mr. Pal

product of a very mer's book : “A Treatise on the Sublime that name. The Science of Heliography, satisfactorily detree makes a very of ice, by Charles Palıner, Gent."-8vo. ing covered with 1799. each of these is Useful Arts.-Every new discovery may

be considered as a new species of manufacthoroughly ripe of mind.- Edinburgh Review. spreads itself into

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touched

prore tbat

VARIETIES.

ocean.

Stet ut ko thua North-West Passage proved by Whales.- through which the sea enters, and retires Whales which bave been harpooned in the with violence; whereas, if they were entirely Greenland seas, have been found in the Pacific composed of madrepores, they would have Ocean; and whales, with some lances stick- no such openings between them, since it is ing in their feet (a kind of weapon used by the property of zoöphytes to build in masses no nation now known), have been caught that have no interruption. It is, besides, both in the sea of Spitzbergen and in Davis' difficult to suppose that these animals can Strait. The following is one of the autho- support such different degrees of pressure rities for this fact, which, of all other argu- and temperature, as they necessarily must, ments yet offered in favour of a transpolar if they exist at such different depths in the passage, seems to be the most satisfactory:

It is, therefore, most reasonable to A Dutch East India captain, of the name conclude, that the summits of submarine of Jacob Cool, of Sardam, who had been hills and mountains are the bases upon several times at Greenland, and was, of which the zoöphytes form layers and raise course, well acquainted with the nature of up their fabrics-a supposition which perthe apparatus used in the whale-fishery, was fectly accounts for the great depths of the informed by the Fischal Zeeman, of India, sea close to the reefs and islards which they that in the sea of Tartary, there was a whale have elevated to the surface of the water. taken, in the back of which was sticking a Fishes of New South Wales.—These, it Dutch harpoon, marked with the letters would appear, are all different from those in W. B. This curious circumstance was com- England. There are scarcely any shell-fish municated to Peter Jansz Vischer, probably on the coast, with the exception of oysters, à Greenland whaler, who discovered that the which are only found on such rocks as are barpoon in question had belonged to William left uncovered by the water at low tide. Bastiaanz, Admiral of the Dutch Greenland And muscles, also, adhere to the stones that fleet, and had been struck into the whale in are always under water; and in some places the Spitzbergen sea.-Beschryving der Wal- cockles are plentiful. visvangst.

Remarkable Migrations of Birds.-By Insects in a Mummy.-M. Figeac, of Gre- wonderful instinct birds will follow cultivanoble, while examining an Egyptian mummy, tion, and make themselves denizens of new found amongst its fingers several dead cole- regions. The cross-bill has followed the opterous insects of a fine rose colour, in all apple into England. Glenco, in the Highits brilliancy. M. Jurine, of Geneva, ascer- lands of Scotland, never knew the partridge tained that they belonged to a nondescript till its farmers, of late years, introduced species of corynetes (fabricius), which he is corn into their lands; nor did sparrows ever disposed to call C. Glaber. Circumstances appear in Siberia until after the Russians indicate that the eggs of those insects were had made arable the vast wastes of those laid on the mummy during the embalming parts of their dominions. Finally, the rice process, and subsequently became perfect buntings, natives of Cuba, after the planting insects. The Arabs, indeed, had opened the of rice in the Carolinas, annually quit the inummy; but the envelope of the hands, island in inyriads, and liy over sea and land where the insects were found, was to partake of a harvest introduced there touched.

from the distant India. It is, however, only * Coral Reefs. It has been generally be- the female rice-bird which migrates. Of the lieved that the deep perpendicular reefs, very myriads which visit Carolina, a single cock near to which the sounding-line finds no is never found. boltom, consist wholly of coral; but MM. Justralian Birds. The birds of New Quoy and Gaimard have adduced very satis- South Wales vary in size, from the emu, factory reasons to prove that the zoophytes, which stands about six feet high, to birds little far from raising from the depths of the ocean larger than the humming-bird in the West perpendicular walls, form only layers or Indies. Black swans, cranes of various cocrusts of a few fathoms' thickness. They lours, white hawks, black and white cockaremark that the species, which always con- toos, and thousands of parrots of the most struct the most considerable banks, require splendid plumage ; ducks and quails are also the influence of light to perfect them; and common. Birds resembling our pigeon, it is well known that all those steep walls, pheasant, and turkey, are also got in numcommon in the equatorial seas, are inter- bers. Among the birds peculiar to the sected with narrow and deep openivgs, country, may be mentioned one called the

laughing-bird; another the coachman, from cast. This wool is much more soft and deits whistle ending in a smack like a whip; licate to the touch than cotton, and the filaanother the bell-bird, from its voice being men's so very tender and fine, that the palike the sound of a bell, and so on. There tives here think that it cannot be spun ; bat are swallows all the season, exactly resem- I am persuaded that this is entirely owing to ·bling those in England.

their ignorance, and, if a method be ever Apes not rational.-Around Gibraltar is discovered of spinping it, its fineness will enfound a sort of ape in great numbers. These title it rather to be called ceibo silk than animals seem fond of warming themselves wool. The only use they have hitherto apat the fires where the soldiers have boiled plied it to is to fill mattresses; and in this their kettles; but, althouglı chips of wood particular it must be allowed to have no are in abundance, the apes never think of equal.—Ulloa's Travels. adding them as fuel.

Early Rising.–We have marked taverns Colour of the Eyes.-In a scarce treatise, and grog-shops, and found them sooner te“ De Coloribus Oculorum," by Portius, it is nanted than any otber places of resort-and remarked, that in blue eyes the interior mem- noticed that a drunkard always commences branes are less abundantly provided with his career early in the day. Look where black mucus, and are thence more sensible you will, and, our life on it, you see a drunkto the action of light. That sort of eyes ard spend no morning in bed unless comsuits the inhabitants of the north during their pelled to do so by last night's debauch. They long twilights; while the deep black of the awake with the first ray of the morning negroes serves to support the vivacity of the light, their minds clouded with horror for light. The blue of the Laplander's eyes, past conduct, their throats burning with an however, but ill supports the light reflected unnatural thirst, and they hasten to quench from the snow, and renders then subject to the one by adding to the other. These peo'cataract.

ple had better let the sun rise upon their 4 singular Glutton.-Charles Domery, slumbers than take another step towards a aged twenty-one, when a prisoner of war at horrid death before breakfast. And yet anLiverpool, consumed, in one day, sixteen other class get and deserve no credit for pounds of meat; namely, four pounds of raw leaving their beds before their neighbours; cow's udder, ten pounds of raw beef, two and these are those who make po good use pounds of tallow candles, besides drinking of their time after they are up. What matfive bottles of porter; and, although he was ters if a man have all the good qualities in allowed the daily rations of ten men, he was the world if he makes no good use of them? not satisfied. In one year be ate 174 cats Would the mines of Peru benefit the world dead and alive.

if suffered to remain in the heart of her Perception in Plants. There are marks of mountains ? A man may get up if he will, perception in plants, at least they have been and spend more time on his feet than any in so accounted; perhaps, however, these are the country, and yet not perform half the more apparent than real. If a cucumber be labour of one who indulges himself in bed planted, and after the branches shoot there till noon. We have heard of a clever old is placed a stone in the way of either of Jady, who was always the first person up in them, the branch will turn off and avoid it, the place, and yet worth nothing after she without touching the stone, describing a

was up. circle around it. After having passed it, it The Sun a Body of Ice.—Many opinions will go on in a straight line. This, which is have been formed concerning the sun, wbich considered as a mark of perception, is only philosophers have sometimes ridiculel, and an instance of the law by which plants al- sometimes seriously refuted. But of all the ways turn to the light; for the plant turns paradoxical assertions respecting that lumiround to get out of the shadow of the pary, none equal Mr. Palmer's, for that gen

tieman positively asserts it to be a body of Ceibo Wool.-The lana de ceibo, or ceibo ice! The following is the title of Mr. Palwool (of Guayaquil), is the product of a very mer's book : “A Treatise on the Sublime high and tufted tree of that name. The Science of Heliography, satisfactorily detrunk is straight, and covered with a smooth monstrating (!) our great orb of light, the bark; the leaf round, and of a middling size. Sun, to be absolutely no other than a body At the proper season the tree makes a very of ice, by Charles Palmer, Gent.”—8vo. beautiful appearance, being covered with '1799. white blossoms; and in each of these is Useful Arts. Every new discovery may formed a pod, 'which increases to about an be considered as a new species of manufacinch and a half or two inches in length, and ture, awakening moral industry and sagaone in thickness. In this pod the lana, or city, and employing, as it were, a new capital wool, is contained. When thoroughly ripe of mind.- Edinburgh Review. and dry the pod opens, and the filamentous matter, or wool, gradually spreads itself into a tuft resembling cotton, but of a reddisha

stone.

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