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LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS TO VOLUME XX.

EMILY J. ADAMS, LUOY ALDRICH, OLLIE ALLSTON, REV. ROBERT ALLYX, A. M., MRS. Axx M. ANDERSOX, REV. II. P. ANDREWS, KATY ATKINS, MERIBA A. BABCOCK, REV. G. BAKER, A BRIE A. BARTLETT, WALTER W. BATTERSHALI, ANNIE M. BEACH, II ARRIET M. BEAN, R. MARIA BECK, REY. J. D. BELL, Rey, J. B. BESHAM, MRS. E. L. BICKSELL, IION. IIORACE P. BIDDLE, Mrs. MARION A. BIGELOW, MRS. C. P. BLAIR, LILLIE A. Bross, Jous BIRROUGHS, NELLIE L. BUTTERFIELD, LYDIA J. CARPENTER, CAROLINE CARROL, Rev. F. S. CASSADY, PHEDE CARY, JANE L. CHAPPELL, Rev. H. CHRISTOPHERSON, LUELLA CLARK, SARAJI B. CLARK, WILLIAX T. COGGEST ALL, CHARLES COLLINS, D.D., CORNELIUS G. COMEGYS, M. D., REV. E. F. COOPER, REV. J. L. CRANE, BENJAMIN F. CRARY, D. D., NANNIE CLARK CUNNINGIAM, DANIEL CURRY, D.D., REV. W. A. DAVIDSON, REV. L. D. DAVIS, MARY A. DEVER, E. H. DEWART, MRS. M. DEXTER, IION. GABRIEL P. DISOSWAY, ANNIS E. DONKERSLEY, REV. RICHARD DONKERSLEY,

NELLIE L. EASTMAN, PROF. E. E. EDWARDS, Rev. Edw. EGGLESTON, SARAH FATSETT, CHUISTOPHER P. FLANDERS, Miss A. FLETCHER, SAMUEL C. FOGG, HLATTIE FRANK, MRS. S. K. FURMAN, MRS. II. C. GARDNER, REV. B. M. GENUNG, MAGGIE GIFFORD, MRS. E. B. GOODY, LIZZIE GOULD, MARY E. GRIGSBY, Mrs.S. TAILOR GRISWOLD, MARY A. IIARLOW, PROF. S. D. HILLMAN, JOSEPH HOLDICH, D. D., MRS. L. A. Holdich, REV. JOSEPH ILORNER, A. M., ERWIN HOUSE, A. M., REV. R. II. HOWARD, ELLEN C. HOWARTH, ANNIE E. HOWE, CHARLES B. HOWELL, EMULY C. HUNTINGTON, SEREPTA M. IRISH, CORINTHA J. IRWIN, MARY B. JANES, AMANDA T. JONES, MARIA KING, CALVIN KINGSLEY, D.D., REV. JOHN P. LACROIX, MARY A. LANCKTON, POLLY LASTIERE, REBECCA LAUCK, REV. S. L. LEONARD, REV. WM. G. W. LEWIS, A. M., MARY E. LOOKER, REV. D. D. LORE, ELLEN E. MACK, REV. R. S. MACLAY, REV. JOHN F. MARLAY, A. M., MRS. N. M'CONAUGHY, REV, T. B. M'FALLS, MRS. LIZZIE MACE M'FARLAND,

1 C. E. C. M'KESNEY, AUGUSTA MOORE, Joseph MOUNT, PROF. THOMAS II. MUDGE, WILLIAM MURPHY, M. D., BERNARD II. NADAL, D.D., WILLIAM NAST, D. D., CHARLES WORDOFF, MINERVA OBORN, REV. WILLIAM OSTRANDER, ZACHARIAH PADDOCK, D, D., MARGARET A. PAINE, EMMA PASSIORE, JOSEPH E. PECK, ELIZABETH E. R. PERRY, MARY JANE PHILLIPS, MARY A. A. PISNEY, MARY M. RAMSEY, MRS. A PRAM REQUA, MISS E. B. ROBINSON, Nelson Rou'sns, D.D., ANNIE L. Rors, MRS. F. M. Rowe, ELLEN T. RUSSELL, RUFUS E. SHAILEY, REV. S. D. SIMONDS, PROF, OLIVER M. SPENCER, MAGGIE B. STEWART, REV. W.G. STONEX, ADELAIDE STOUT, William P. STRICKLAND, D. D., REV. J. A, SWANEY, THRACE TALMON, GEORGE L. TAYLOR, MRS, E. S. THOMAS, LYDIA A. TOMPKINS, VIRGINIA F. TOWNSEND, PAMELIA S. VINING, REV. WM. F. WARREN, GEORGE WERBER, D.D., REV. J. C. WELLS, ERASTUS WENTWORTH, D. D., MARY E. WILCOX, SAMUEL W. WILLIAMS, Prof. WILLIAM G. WILLIAMS, JULIA M'NAIR WRIGJIT, PROF. WILLIAM H. YOUNG.

THE

LADIES' REPOSITORY.

JANUARY, 1860.

REwers of the Baltimore conference

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REV. ALFRED GRIFFITH. hood; but the circle of the sciences which lay

open to him, narrow as it was, still contained BY REV. B. H. NADAL, D. D.

something for which he had a special aptitude, EV. ALFRED GRIFFITH, one of the fa- and in which he found great satisfaction. He

was by nature a Pythagorean; his soul had a Montgomery county, Maryland, March 16, 1783. near affinity to numbers. With such pleasure His father was a captain in the war of Inde- and success did he prosecute the study of arithpendence, and an active participant in many of metic, that at the age of thirteen he had twice its battles. At the battle of Germantown Gen- threaded to the end the mazes of Dilworth, and eral Smallwood called for volunteers to dislodge his honest master sent him home to his father a body of grenadiers, who were making sad with the message, that he had taught his son all havoc with the American lines. Captain Griffith, that he himself knew, and as he did not wish to among others, presented himself with his com- receive money without rendering an equivalent, pany for this service, and of eighty-four men, the the boy had better be kept at home. number of his command, he returned from the His father seeing his skill in figures and his charge with only sixteen, himself bearing a fear- devotion to them, next determined to start him ful wound, whose honorable scar he carried to in the higher mathematics. A gentleman living

some six miles away, and noted as a mathemaThe influences which surrounded Mr. Griffith tician, was teaching a class of three young men; in very early life were not friendly to spiritual into this class young Griffith entered, and, though religion. His family were adherents of the Epis- a boy, nobly and successfully struggled with those copal Church, whose parsons, in those days, were greatly his seniors for the palm of distinction. in the habit of attending the frolics, particularly No one well acquainted with Mr. Griffith can for the dancing parties in the parish, and as the a moment doubt what would have been the result most distinguished of the guests, with some staid had he continued in that line of study; as it is, and churchly matron, leading off the merry mathematical precision and directness are among dance—thus giving the Church's sanction and his most marked characteristics. the pastor's blessing to the sports of the night. Immediately upon the heels of these things Grace being thus done for the hop, and "reel," came occurrences which seriously threatened to and "honey-moon,” left in the “odor of sanc- give to Mr. Griffith's life a direction altogether tity,” the parson retired into what was called the different from that which is now history. We gentleman's room to perform a like office for the refer to his father's purpose to make him a lawcards, and for the bowls of apple-toddy, the favor- yer. A preceptor had already been engaged, ite beverage of the people of Montgomery at when, as was supposed, it was found needful, bethat period. Under such religious influences in fore allowing the lad to encounter the mysteries the neighborhood, unopposed by any thing differ- of his destined profession, that he should spend ent at home, it is not to be wondered at that Mr. some time in the study of Latin, and the day Griffith can recall no early religious impressions, was actually fixed for starting him to Princeton. and remembers his boyhood as remarkable mostly His mother's interposition, however, or perhaps for its irrepressible tendencies to mischief. rather that of divine Providence, spoiled the

Mr. Griffith's opportunities for education were scheme and prevented the consummation of the such only as were afforded by his own neighbor- father's hopes. One day, a short time before the

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journey to Princeton was to have taken place, | ligion every one said if there was a Christian the husband and father, seated at his desk exam left among them it was Charles. Charles and ining his accounts, heard his wife in another part his mistress were both Methodists. Mr. Lee of the room sobbing as though her heart would having determined to open the campaign at this break, and turning to inquire the cause, he was place, covenanted with the faithful, saintly met by a response something like the following: Charles, that at the next meeting, while he—Mr. “Why, you are going to send off that poor boy Lee-should be preaching in the principal room, to college to make a lawyer of him.” “Well, Charles should be on his knees, in a shed-room, what of that? What is there in it to make you opening into that in which the service was procry?” “What is there in it? Why, I never in ceeding, engaged in agonizing supplication for my life knew a lawyer who was not a wicked the success of the word. When the time came, man, and if our boy should become one he 'll be and the neat, the graceful, the attractive preacher, just like the rest of them, and he 'll be lost." of whom men stood in awe while they admired

After this dialogue it was never known what him, arose in the crowded parlor, true to his enhad become of the law; it was somehow or other gagement Charles was on his knees in the sheddisposed of, and history, and the Church, and room, and as the word fell from the lips of the Providence were left free to introduce the minister, the prayer of faith from God's image preacher. In after life, when this incident was in ebony ascended the hill of the Lord. There related to Rev. John Davis, the bosom friend of was present on that day in that place a power Mr. Griffith, he familiarly but feelingly ejacula- more than human: the people cried out aloud; ted, "God bless the old lady! I always loved they fell on every side; they shouted; they prayed; her, but I love her now better than ever; for if they implored; they wept sore, so that the room they had made you a lawyer, you never would at that moment presented a scene, which, viewed have been a preacher, and the devil would have by the eye of criticism, might have been characgotten you."

terized as confusion worse confounded. Into the Mr. Griffith was converted in the great revival midst of this scene now came the pious Charles. which began in 1799, under the Rev. Wilson Lee. He had heard the Lord's answer of human shouts Mr. Lee had just returned from the wilds of Ken- and groans, and not venturing to rise, he entered tucky, where his body and mind had both been the room walking on his knees, while the tears broken down by his incessant labors and an un streamed down over his black face, now made, friendly climate. Mr. Asbury found it necessary if not wbite, at least intensely bright, by the to bring him back to his native air; but Mr. Lee's grateful joy which overspread it. Many souls religion was of that type that knows no rest but were converted at that single meeting, which was with the cessation of life. He had scarcely gone the more glorious because it was only one of a his first round on Montgomery circuit, where he glorions series-only the beginning of a widelyfound religion at a low ebb, when bis zeal broke extended, long-continued revival of religion, forth afresh, consuming himself perhaps, but reaching to Baltimore city and county, to Fredawakening new life in the Church-the life of a erick county, to the Eastern Shore of Maryland, I holy, happy experience, preparing her for un to Pennsylvania, and to Virginia, and lasting till wonted aggressions and unrivaled successes. 1808. In the early part of this most gracious

During this year–1799—as it appears from period—1801—Mr. Griffith was awakened under the Minutes, Mr. Lee was only a supernumerary the ministry of Rev. John Potts, and was soon on Montgomery circuit; and as the Minutes show after admitted into the Church by Rev. David that the great increase took place the following Stevens. year, the great revival, however prepared for the In a short time the youthful convert was apyear before, must belong to the years 1800 and pointed leader of his class and soon after made 1801, when Mr. Lee was preacher in charge. Its his first attempt to preach. The beginning to beginning was on this wise. Living near St. preach happened in this way: A local preacher James's Church, in Howard county, at that time was expected to fill an appointment in the church embraced in Anne Arundel, was a gentleman by to which Mr. Griffith belonged, but for some reathe name of Daniel Elliot, whose house was a son did not come, and the brethren insisted that regular preaching-place. In the same vicinity he-Mr. Griffith-should take his place. Preach! was the home of an excellent lady, Mrs. Elder, why, he had allowed no one to know that he had a sister of Governor Howard, who was equally ever even dreamed of such a thing. He resisted distinguished for elegant urbanity and humble right manfully, but they persisted obstinately, till, piety. But even more distinguished for piety, almost forced by their urgency, he asked permisand especially for faith, was her colored waiting. sion to retire into the woods, telling them that man Charles. In the general declension of re upon his return he would let them know whether

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or not he could preach. In retirement and carried off by the foxes, the bears, the panthers, prayer he sought divine direction and returned the wolves. If now and then a man was resolved to try. When the preaching was over found bold enough to attempt to keep a hog, the he found himself unable to recall any thing he pen was built just at the front door of the cabin; had said, but he remembered well what he had and if he owned a calf it was brought up and seen and heard—the flowing tears, the hearty re- tied behind the house every night, and the guns sponses, the joyful shouts.

kept loaded and at hand to drive off or kill the At a quarterly meeting, not long after, when invading panther or wolf. As they rested at Mr. Griffith was not present, the Rev. Enoch night on their bear-skins or deer-sking, they freGeorge, afterward Bishop, had him licensed as a quently heard around them the wailing scream local preacher; and when the circuit preacher of the panther or the howl of the wolf, and the came round he handed the unsuspecting youth a sight of a bear was more common than that of a piece of paper, which, on opening, he discovered pig or a lamb. to be a license to preach, and immediately let it The sleeping was as poor, in some instances, fall. The minister picked it up, and handing it as the eating and drinking About fifty miles again to Mr. Griffith said: “Brother George told from the flats lived a humble family by the me he supposed you would not accept the license, name of Kramer, consisting of husband and and directed me to say that if you refused to wife, with one son, Abraham by name. Their preach God would kill you.” The young man house was both stopping-place and church for retained the paper.

our young itinerant, who had for his bed, when The last quarterly meeting of the following he remained over night with them, the frame of year brought with it a scene for which Mr. Grif- an old loom, across whose beams were laid slats, fith, with all his convictions, was scarcely pre- and on the slats a bear-skin or two. These, with pared. Presiding elder George was in the chair, a pair of clean sheets, which were kept excluand besides Mr. Griffith there were present at sively for the preachers, and a few superincumleast two other local preachers. When the ques- bent duds, constituted the sleeping apparatus. tion of recommendations to the annual confer- Abe, as he was familiarly called, was the preachence to be received on trial came up, there were er's bed-fellow; and on one occasion, when Mr. propositions to recommend both the others, but Griffith had just committed himself to his loom each of them, as his name was mentioned, made and bear-skins for the night and lay waiting for his apology and declined. The presiding elder young Abraham, who was a stalwart boy of then named Mr. Griffith, and turning his eye twenty, he happened to cast his eye into one corupon him and shaking his finger solemnly, or, ner of the room, or rather of the house, that rather, menacingly in his face, he said, “Now, room being the only one, when a sight met him do you too flash in the pan if you dare.” The at once puzzling and grotesque. There was good young preacher was silent; this was but the re- mother Kramer, with her boy Abe before her, utterance of the divine voice which had been who stood with lamb-like docility while the old speaking within him from the hour of his con- lady pinned round him a snow-white sheet, which version.

reached from the chin to the ground, making him In 1806 the subject of our sketch was received look, his decidedly-human head being excepted, into the Baltimore conference and appointed to for all the world like a veritable ghost. “Why, Wyoming circuit, with Christopher Frye as his mother," said the young preacher, "what on earth colleague. The circuit, like all others in that are you doing to Abe? Are you making a ghost day, was large, and the fare poor and coarse of him ??? No, child," replied the inventive enough. The only drink they had besides water housewife, “no; but Abe is n't fit to sleep with a was coffee (?) made of buckwheat bread. The preacher unless he is wrapped up in some such process of making this drink was to hold a piece way as this." of buckwheat bread, called a slap-jack, in the At one of his appointments the young preacher fire with the tongs till completely charred, and was met by an Irishman by the name of Matthew then to boil it in an iron pot. The liquor thus Bortree, who had been a Methodist in his native obtained, sweetened with maple sugar, received country, but having emigrated to this country from Mr. Griffith the name of slap-jack coffee, and settled where he enjoyed no religious advantand by this designation came to be generally ages, he had become cold and backslidden. But known. As to eating, from early in June till the Holy Spirit again visited him, and he became autumn, except when on the flats, they had not a deeply anxious to retrieve his spiritual losses, morsel of meat of any kind. Poultry could not and the object of his present visit was to get the be raised, nor pigs, nor sheep; for as soon as promise of the preachers to visit his settlement any thing of the sort made its appearance it was and establish there an appointment. The settle

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ment was of about twenty years' standing, and of Bill Clemens, who asked him what he meant yet a sermon had never been heard, nor a minis- by the Methodist Church. The answer was given ter of the Gospel seen in it. Upon consultation by reading from the Discipline the General between the preachers it was determined that Mr. Rules and the Articles of Faith. Clemens, with Griffith should make the first visit to the new ili-suppressed indications of feeling, remarked, field and preach the Gospel "in the regions be that if that was all he would not object to beyond,” to people who had never heard its joyful coming a Methodist himself. The appointment proclamation. The time was fixed and a young was regularly kept up, and when winter set in man was to be sent to meet the preacher at Kra- the seriousness, marked from the first, had grown mer's and conduct him through a great wilder- into deep penitence, and there was a repetition ness, called the “Big Beech Woods," to Bortree's of those scenes of revival which had been withouse. In pursuance of his engagement, at the nessed in so many other parts of the country. proper time Mr. Griffith started for Kramer's

The young preacher could but observe that these rode all day without eating a morsel, and reached people who had never beheld a revival, had never the friendly cabin about nightfall, having come even read of one, were converted, wept, rejoiced, fifty miles. Of course he was weary and hungry. shouted, just as he had seen so many do in his Mother Kramer said she was glad to see him, but native state; and before conference every man sorry he had come, for she had nothing, nothing and woman, and every child over fourteen years at all to give him to eat. Mr. Griffith said he old in the whole settlement had professed religwas sorry too, for he was very hungry-could n't ion and joined the Church, with a single excepmother Kramer possibly find something that a tion, and he was a whisky-seller. Even this man could eat? The good woman promised to man's wife was brought in. The reformation, try, and upon rummaging among some broken however, took from him his occupation, and curscrockery she found a dry crust of bread, which, ing the neighborhood into heaps he left for parts added to a very small fish which Abe had that unknown. Matthew Bortree became a local day caught in the branch, and which she imme- preacher and Bill Clemens a class-leader; and diately cooked, was the supper and dinner of the on the spot where Bortree's house stood now young preacher, after a ride of fifty miles and stands, as we are informed, a fine church. preaching twice. The fish and bread, which In 1813 Mr. Griffith was stationed in AnnapoProvidence made sufficient without a miracle, lis. During that year the British threatened the being found, the good woman drew out a wash-place, coming quite near with their ships, and tub, and placing a board over it for a table, on lying there for some time to the no small annoywhich in the moiety of a plate she arrayed the ance and damage of the country people espedinner, and before which she placed a three-legged cially, whose cattle they carried off in considerastool, she invited the preacher to eat, adding, as ble numbers. Annapolis had to be fortified, and she concluded ber invitation, “There 's your Mr. Griffith, with the zeal and self-sacrifice of a dinner, it 's all I bave; if I had more you true patriot, worked day by day with spade, or should have it. But if you are a good man it's shovel, or pick, along side of the stoutest in good enough for you, and if not it's too good.” throwing up the breast-works. In connection By daybreak the next morning the father and with this work he tells an amusing little story. Abe had returned from the mill, whither they At that time we had no penitentiary in Maryland, had gone to replenish their exhausted larder, and and the class of criminals now confined in that the young itinerant had, considering time and description of prisons was compelled to work on place, a good breakfast; plenty of corn-bread, the public highways, at the wheel-barrow, with washed down with slap-jack coffee—that and ball and chain about the leg. Living at Annapnothing else.

olis was an old Mr. B., a Democrat and a great The next evening he and his guide arrived at wag, between whom and a student at St. John's the settlement and were met by seventy or eighty College by the name of K., still living, there were 1 persons, all anxious to see that strange sight, a frequent sharp and witty passages, the latter be

preacher. He put up with Bortree, and no sooner ing a zealous Whig. It so happened in the apwas he in the house than they insisted he should portionment of the work of digging, and pitchpreach the same evening. He consented, and ing, and wheeling, that the wheel-barrow fell to while he preached the people gazed and won- the lot of Mr. K., whose Democratic opponent dered—not one present, perhaps, except Bortree, rejoiced over him, telling him that “Jimmy Madihad ever before been witness of such a scene. son had brought him to the wheel-barrow at last.” The next day he preached morning, afternoon, Wheel-barrow man was the name for a convict. and night. After the second service, he was ap- The next year saw our friend stationed at proached by a great, rough fellow by the name Fell's Point, Baltimore. During this year, us our

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