Cobbett's Political Register, Volume 36

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William Cobbett
William Cobbett, 1820 - Great Britain

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Page 23 - I had ever read before : it was something so new to my mind, that, though I could not at all understand some of it, it delighted me beyond description ; and it produced what I have always considered a sort of birth of intellect. I read on till it was dark, without any thought about supper or bed. When I could see no longer, I put my little book in my pocket...
Page 23 - I had lost somehow or other, left threepence in my pocket. With this for my whole fortune, I was trudging through Richmond in my blue smockfrock, and my red garters tied under my knees, when, staring about me, my eye fell upon a little book in a bookseller's window, on the outside of which was written
Page 559 - Albion is still in the chains of slavery — I quit it without regret — I shall soon be consigned to the grave — my body will be immured beneath the soil whereon I first drew breath. My only sorrow is, that the soil should be a theatre for slaves, for cowards, for despots.
Page 497 - King and his laws, to the evil example of all others in the like case offending, and against the peace of our said Lord the King, his crown, and dignity.
Page 1121 - Parliament, derogatory from the dignity of the Crown, and injurious to the best interests of the empire.
Page 1027 - ... understood, for reasons of which he alone can be the judge, to be his fixed and unalterable determination not to meet the Princess of Wales upon any occasion, either in public or private.
Page 1079 - The king is willing to recommend to parliament to enable his majesty to settle an annuity of 50,000 a-year upon the queen, to be enjoyed by her during her natural life, and in lieu of any claim in the nature of jointure or otherwise, provided she will engage not to come into any part of the British dominions, and provided she engages to take some other name or title than that of queen ; and not to exercise any of the rights or privileges of queen, other than with respect to the appointment of law-officers,...
Page 1025 - ... judgment peculiarly unfortunate. She, who is destined to be the Sovereign of this great country, enjoys none of those advantages of society which are deemed necessary for imparting a knowledge of mankind to persons who have infinitely less occasion to learn that important lesson; and it may so happen, by a chance which I trust is very remote, that she should be called upon to exercise the powers of the Crown, with an experience of the world more confined than that of the most private individual.
Page 877 - The book was so different from anything that I had ever read before : it was something so new to my mind, that, though I could not at all understand some of it, it delighted me beyond description ; and it produced what I have always considered a sort of birth of intellect.
Page 1023 - ... betrays his duty to you, sir, to your daughter, and to your people, if he counsels you to permit a day to pass without a further investigation of my conduct. I know that no such calumniator will venture to recommend a measure which must speedily end in his utter confusion. Then let me implore you...

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