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quiry has yet been able to discover the papers of Mr. Ince, who was an amiable and accomplished man, and, it is said, pårticularly conversant in Greek literature.

In 1740, Mr. Ince, through the interest of Lord Granville, who had been his associate at Westminster school, obtained the office of secretary to the comptrollers of army accounts; a place, the duties of which he performed for twelve years with so much courtesy as well as regularity, that he was rewarded not only with the approbation of the public, but with the warmest affection of those whom he immediately employed. On the decease of his brother, Mr. Ince came into the possession of an affluent fortune, which he spent with liberality and elegance, and died on the 13th of October, 1758.

46. CAREY, MR. of New College in Oxford, was, according to the acknowledgment of Steele, an assistant in the Spectator. His pieces, how, ever, are unķnown; and probably, from the length of time which has now elapsed, no enquiry will in future be competent to their detection. )

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We have now reached the close of that enumeration, which we professed to give, of those who are known to have contributed, in any degree, to the composition of the Tatler, Spectator, and Guardian. The essays including this series have extended, notwithstanding the adoption of a plan of great brevity, much beyond the limits to which they had originally been circumscribed, owing to the discovery, as the work proceeded, of no less than twelve names, in addition to the number which had been stated in the preface.

The execution of so many miniature sketches must necessarily be attended with considerable difficulty. To compress a volume into a few pages with little injury to the interest and effect, will be pronounced an enterprize of no easy achievement; and where, on the other hand, the materials are triling or defective, it is an attempt of still greater labour to give them a structure and arrangement which shall gratify the reader. It has been my aim, however, notwithstanding the frequent recurrence of these obstacles, to render the biography of these three essays not only accurate but entertaining; and I have therefore availed myself of eyery resource, that, consistently with the space to which I have confined myself, seemed likely to impart the stamp of novelty, instruction, or amusement.

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As the succession of names has been regulated by the number and importance of the communications, and not by the title of the Paper to which they are attached; it will, in my opinion, prove an useful and satisfactory appendix, to throw into tabular forms, under the appellations of Tatler, Spectator, and Guardian, the respective contributors to these papers, and the comparative quantity of their assistance. Thus the reader will, at one view, perceive by whose labours, and in what proportion, each work was constructed.

TATLER- No 271.

Contributors.

Entire Papers.

Letters and Parts

of Papers.

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Steele.....
Addison....
Steele and Addison..
Swift and Addison..
Hughes
Swift
Fuller
Asplin
Congreve
Twisden....
Henley, Anthony
Greenwood
Harrison
Dartiquenave.

3
1
1
1
1
1

12

271

24

In this table of the Tatler, I have attributed to Steele all those papers in which, with the exception of Addison, he was an associate with the other contributors; they amount, as the arrangement shews, to twenty-four. The entire essays of Sir Richard, therefore, may be estimated at 164, a proportion of the whole which places in a very striking light his industry, and the fertility of his resources.

SPECTATOR--N°635.

Contributors.

Entire Papers.

Letters and Parts

of Papers.

13

1

Addison.
Steele
Budgell
Hughes
Grove
Pope
Parnell
Pearce
Martyn
Byrom
Swift
Brome
Francham
Dunlop
Hardwicke.
Fleetwood
Tickell

274
240
37
11
4
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1

1

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2

SPECTATOR---N° 635---Continued.

1

Contributors.

Entire Papers.

Letters and Parts

of Papers.

Philips
Eusden
Henley, John...
Shepheard, Miss
Perry, Mrs...
Heywood
Watts....
Weaver
Parker
Golding
Harper ...
Motteux...
Budgell, Gilbert
Bland
Ince.
Carey.
Anonymous

2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

53

33

635

35

The numbers in this table of the Spectator, which the letters and parts of papers contributed to form, are ascribed to Addison, or to Steele, as they respectively assisted in their construction. In the Tatler and Guardian, the annotators have constantly given to Steele those papers for which no other owner could be found; and in the Spectator they have allotted him every one to which

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