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from the close of the commission, to the government in favor of whose citizens the greater amount may have been awarded, without interest or any other deduction than that specified in Article VI of this couvenw r h tion. The residue of the said balance shall be paid in b»uni£,Vt!l,r nnS annual instalments to an amount not exceeding three hundred o«to ,c „», thousand dollars, in gold or its equivalent, in any one year until the whole shall have been paid.

Article V.

The high contracting parties agree to consider the result of the pron,,, commi».ioB ceedings of this commission as a full, perfect, and final seta°«r^ttrtm«ni"o1 tlement of every claim upon either government arising out S^wonhorit,- of any transaction of a date prior to the exchange of the acation. hereof. ratifications of the present convention; and further engage that every such claim, whether or not the same may have been presented to the notice of, made, preferred, or laid before the said commission, shall, from and after the conclusion of the proceedings of the said commission, be considered and treated as finally settled, barred, and thenceforth inadmissible.

Article VI.

The commissioners and the umpire shall keep an accurate record and Rootd. „rth<, correct minutes of their proceedings, with the dates. For Jo'Sin^iX of aTM that purpose they shall appoint two secretaries versed in soutane.. the language of both countries to assist them in the transm action of the business of the commission. Each government

shall pay to its commissioner an amount of salary not exceeding forty-five hundred dollars a year in the currency of the United States, which amount shall be the same for both governments. The amount of compensation to bo paid to the umpire shall be determined by mutual consent at the close of the commission, bnt necessary and reasonable advances may be made by each government upon the joint recommendation of the commission. The salary of the secretaries shall not exceed the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars a year in the currency of the United States. The whole expenses of the commission, t„ be l"h,cf""'m including contingent expenses, shall be defrayed by a ratable

not to exceed five

deduction on the amount of the sums awarded by the eoinperMm. t ere. mission, provided always that such deduction shall not exceed five per cent, on the sums so awarded. The deficiency, if any, shall be defrayed in moieties by the two governments.

Article VII.

The present convention shall be ratified by the President of the United iutiacatior>,,irher. States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate to b. exch.wk thereof, and by the President of the Mexican Republic, with the approbation of the Congress of that Republic; and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington within nine months from the date hereof, or sooner if possible.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same, and have affixed thereto the seals of their arms.

Done at Washington, the fourth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixtv-eight.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.' Fl. S.
M. ROMERO. [L. s.

MEXICO, 18G8.

CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE REPUBLIC OF MEXICO, FOR REGULATING THE CITIZENSHIP OF EMIGRANTS. CONCLUDED JULY 10, 1868; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED FEBRUARY 1, 1869; PROCLAIMED FEBRUARY 1, 1869.

The President of the United States of America and the President of the Republic of Mexico, being desirous of regulating the citizenship of persons who emigrate from Mexico to the onl"ai"'Kn"MUnited States of America, and from the United States of America to the Republic of Mexico, have decided to treat on this subject, and with this object have named as Plenipotentiaries, the President of the United States, William H. Seward, Secretary of State; and the President of Mexico, Matias Romero, accredited as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Mexico uear the Government of the United States; who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and due form; have agreed upon the following articles:

Article I.

Those citizens of the United States who have been made citizens of the Mexican Republic by naturalization, and have resided, Citi«,,„»ortheon. without interruption, in Mexican territory five years, shall \r?£yoZe?,"lu"i be held by the United States as citizens of the Mexican ^ii,"dfS^th" Republic, and shall be treated as such. Reciprocally, citi- °°'"'t"zens of the Mexican Republic who have become citizens of the United States, and who have resided uninterruptedly in the territory of the United States for five years, shall be held by the Republic of Mexico as citizens of the United States, and shall be treated as such. The declaration of an intention to become a citizen of the one or the other country has not for either party the effect of naturali- tri.tK,»TM"b^me'« zation. This article shall apply as well to those already tlio efftict of rmturnlinaturalized in either of the countries contracting as to those *"""L hereafter naturalized.

Article II.

Naturalized citizens of either of the contracting parties, on return to the territory of the other, remain liable to trial and punish- N«umjiwd ciument for an action punishable by the laws of his original ^^"^""u'.iS country, and committed before his emigration; saving al- "V'^JtJiil'. ways the limitations established by his original country. f0"

Article III.

The convention for the surrender in certain cases of criminals, fugitives from justice, concluded between the United States of c»v*io„nie. America of the one part, and the Mexican Republic on the fJT^.'ijS hJ, other part, on the eleventh day of December, one thousand [r"oTJr"o"ui'i eight hundred and sixty-one, shall remain in full force with- forc*out any alteration.

Article IV.

If a citizen of the United States naturalized in Mexico renews his residence in the United States without the intent to return NatuHtlon,w to Mexico, he shall be held to have renounced his naturali- »'"""»•■»•'■

zation in Mexico. Reciprocally, if a Mexican naturalized in the United States renews his residence in Mexico without the intent to return to the United States, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization in the United States.

The intent not to return may be held to exist when the person natu

ralized in the one country resides in the other country more ..ot i'°,exnm""m°i than two years, but this presumption may be rebutted by

evidence to the contrary.

Aeticle V.

The present convention shall go into effect immediately on the exchange whenihi,<ron«en. of ratifications, and it shall remain in full force for ten years. a?°how1 If neither of the contracting parties shall give notice to the

in lbTM. other six mouths previously of its intention to terminate the

same, it shall further remain in force until twelve months after either of the contracting parties shall have given notice to the other of such intention.

Aeticle VI.

. The present convention shall be ratified by the President of the United tuuicttioiu, when States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate tot.eichnn.ed. thereof, and by the President of the Mexican Republic, with the approval of the Congress of that republic, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in Washington within nine months from the date hereof.

In faith whereof the Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this convention at the city of Washington, this tenth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred aud sixty-eight.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD, [l. S.

M. ROMERO. [L. &

[The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo did not protect the rights of property of Mexican citizens in the former Republic of Texas. (McKinney vs. Saviego, 18 Howard, 235.)]

MEXICO, 1871.

CONVENTION BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE UNITED STATES OF MEXICO FOR EXTENSION OF THE DURATION OF THE JOINT COMMISSION FOR SETTLEMENT OF CLAIMS. SIGNED APRIL 19, 1871; RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED FEBRUARY S, 1872; PROCLAIMED FEBRUARY 8, 1872.

Whereas a convention was concluded on the 4th day of July, 1868, between the United States of America and the United States of Mexico, for the settlement of outstanding claims that have originated since the signing of the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, on the 2d of February, 1848, by a mixed commission limited to endure for two years and six months from the day of the first meeting of the commissioners; and whereas doubts have arisen as to the practicability of the business of the said commission being concluded within the period assigned:

The President of the United States of America and the President of the ^ United States of Mexico are desirous that the time originally °"p fixed for the duration of the said commission should be extended, and to this end have named Plenipotentiaries to agree upon the best mode of effecting this object that is to say: The President of the United States of America, Thomas H. Nelson, accredited as Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to the Mexican Kepublic; and the President of the United States of Mexico, Manuel Azpiroz, Chief Clerk and in charge of the Ministry of Foreign Relations of the United States of Mexico; who, after having presented their respective powers, and rinding them sufficient and in due form, have agreed upon the following articles:

Article I.

The high contracting parties agree that the term assigned in the convention of the 4th of July, 1808, above referred to, for the ^ f .. duration of the said commission, shall be extended for a TMm°TM,'°", "ar''"£ tune not exceeding one year from the day when the tunc- ^tTM,M for one tions of the said commission would terminate according to the convention referred to, or for a shorter time if it should be deemed sufficient by the commissioners, or the umpire in case of their disagreement.'

It is agreed that nothing contained in this article shall in anywise alter or extend the time originally fixed in the said convention for the presentation of claims to the mixed commission.

Article II.

When this convention is to he ratified.

The present convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington, as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the above-mentioned Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and affixed their respective seals.

Done in the city of Mexico the 19th day of April, in the year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-one.

THOMAS H. NELSON, [seal.
MANUEL AZPIROZ. [seal.

MOROCCO.

MOKOCOO, 1787.

TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND HIS IMPERIAL MAJESTY THE EMPEROR OF MOROCCO. CONCLUDED JANUARY, 1787; RATIFIED BY THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES JULY 18, 1787.

To all persona to whom these presents shall come or be made known:

Whereas the United States of America, in Congress assembled, by their commission bearing date the twelfth day of May, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four, thought proper to constitute John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Thomas Jefferson, their Ministers Plenipotentiary, giving to them, or a majority of them, full powers to confer, treat, and negotiate with the Ambassador, Minister, or Commissioner of his Majesty the Emperor of Morocco, concerning a treaty of amity and commerce; to make and receive propositions for such treaty, and to conclude and sign the same, transmitting it to the United States in Congress assembled, for their final ratification; and by one other commission, bearing date the eleventh day of March, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, did further empower the said Ministers Plenipotentiary, or a majority of them, by writing under their hands and seals, to appoint such agent in the said business as they might think proper, with authority under the directions and instructions of the said Ministers, to commence and prosecute the said negotiations and conferences for the said treaty, provided that the said treaty should be signed by the said Ministers: And whereas we, the said John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, two of the said Ministers Plenipotentiary, (the said Benjamin Franklin being absent,) by writing under the hand and seal of the said John Adams at London, October the fifth, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, and of the said Thomas Jefferson at Paris, October the eleventh of the same year, did appoint Thomas Barclay agent in the business aforesaid, giving him the powers therein, which, by the said second commission, we were authorized to give, and the said Thomas Barclay, in pursuance thereof, hath arranged articles for a treaty of amity aud commerce between the United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of Morocco, which articles, written in the Arabic language, confirmed by His said Majesty the Emperor of Morocco, aud sealed with his royal seal, being translated into the language of the said United States of America, together with the attestations thereto annexed, are in the following words, to wit:

[ROYAL SEAL.]

In the name of Almighty God.

This is a treaty of peace and friendship established between'us and the United States of America, which is confirmed, and which we have ordered to be written in this book, and sealed with our royal seal, at our court of Morocco, on the twenty-fifth day of the blessed 'month of Sua

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