The history of the most serene house of Brunswick-Lunenburgh [signed D.J.].

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Page 380 - My skill goes beyond the depth of a pond, Or rivers in the greatest rain, Whereby I can tell, all things will be well, When the king enjoys his own again. There's neither swallow, dove, nor dade, Can soar more high, or deeper wade ; Nor...
Page 295 - An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown, and better securing the Rights and Liberties of the Subject...
Page 232 - An act for the further security of his Majesty's person and the succession of the crown in the Protestant line, and for extinguishing the hopes of the pretended Prince of Wales, and all other pretenders, and their open and secret abettors...
Page 295 - Elettorefs and Dutchefs Dowager of Hanover, and the 'Heirs of her Body, being Proteftants, upon whom the Crown of England is fettled, by an...
Page 408 - The assuring of the Protestant succession, as by law established in the House of Hanover, to these kingdoms; being what I have nearest at heart, particular care is taken not only to have that acknowledged in the strongest terms, but to have an additional security, by the removal of that person out of the dominions of France, who has pretended to disturb this settlement.
Page 296 - Britain, and the dominions thereunto belonging, or any part thereof; and in every fuch cafe, the Crown and Government fhall, from time to time, defcend to, and be enjoyed, by fuch perfon, being a...
Page 234 - ... and the heirs of her body, was produced by Mr. Fletcher, of Saltoun. The earl of Rothes recommended another, importing, that, after her...
Page 390 - Provinces only is concerrt'd in it : On the contrary, it is full as much the Concern of Great Britain? which...
Page 259 - Sovereignty, during her Life (which' God long preferve) hath not by any Means yet been induced to fettle the fame Succeffion to the Crown, as is eftablifhed by Law in this Kingdom, in the Proteftant Line ; but on the contrary, that...
Page 373 - Dean of Faculty, whatever these gentlemen may say of their loyalty, I think they affront the Queen whom they pretend to honour, in disgracing her brother, who is not only a prince of the blood, but the first thereof; and if blood can give any right, he is our undoubted sovereign. I think, too, they call her Majesty's title in question, which is not our business to determine.

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