The Military Profession in the United States: And the Means of Promoting is Usefulness and Honour; an Address, Delivered Before the Dialectic Society of the Corps of Cadets of the Military Academy, Westpoint, at the Close of the Annual Examination, June 19th, 1839

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Page 23 - However pacific the general policy of a nation may be, it ought never to be without an adequate stock of military knowledge for emergencies. The first would impair the energy of its character, and both would hazard its safety, or expose it to greater evils, when war could not be avoided. Besides, that war might not often depend upon its own choice.
Page 25 - ... the conflicting interests of nations. Nor is learning less humanizing and pacific in its influence when applied to the military art. " During the dark ages which followed the wreck of the Roman power, the military science by which that power had been reared, was lost with other branches of learning. When learning revived, the military art revived with it, and contributed not a little to the restoration of the empire of mind over that of brute force. Then, too, every great discovery in the art...
Page 23 - Whatever argument may be drawn from particular examples, superficially viewed, a thorough examination of the subject will evince that the art of war is at once comprehensive and complicated ; that it demands much previous study; and that the possession of it, in its most improved and perfect state, is always of great moment to the security of a nation.
Page 23 - In proportion as the observance of pacific maxims might exempt a nation from the necessity of practising the rules of the military art, ought to be its care in preserving and transmitting, by proper establishments, the knowledge of that art. Whatever argument may be drawn from particular examples, superficially viewed, a thorough examination of the subject will evince, that the art of war is at once comprehensive and complicated ; that it demands much previous study ; and that the possession...
Page 12 - we were compelled to maintain, by open war, our quarrel with the principal aggressors. After many years of forbearance and negotiation, our claims in other cases were at length amicably settled ; but in one of the most noted of these cases, it was not without much delay and imminent hazard of war that the execution of the treaty was finally enforced. No one acquainted with these portions of our history, can hesitate to ascribe much of the wantonness and duration of the wrongs we endured, to a knowledge...
Page v - Resolution, which was unanimously adopted : — Resolved, That the thanks of the Society be presented to...
Page 31 - Quintilian says, that he spoke with the same force with which he fought ; and if he had devoted himself to the bar, would have been the only man capable of rivalling Cicero.
Page 20 - Among associates in arms, it is only by a bland and gentlemanly deportment, that the tone of command can be divested of harshness, and the just and necessary authority of the superior be preserved, without grating on the feelings of the subordinate. It is not less important among equals ; it prevents collisions ; secures harmony ; and gives a graceful and imposing air to the intercourse of the garrison and the camp.
Page 8 - States, does not exint, and as has been well said.f "the genius of our political institutions and the settled convictions of our people forbid the maintenance among us of large standing armies. They are justly dreaded as productive of useless and wasteful expenditure ; injurious to the habits and morals of the people, and dangerous to public liberty.
Page 11 - ... organize, in case of need, an efficient army, is indispensable to the preservation of peace on our borders, and with other nations. The history of our...

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