The Admiralty Decisions of Sir William Young, Kt. ... 1865-1880

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Page 152 - part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, the islands of Man, Guernsey, Jersey, Alderney, and Sark, and the islands adjacent to any of them being part of the dominions of her majesty.
Page 81 - Canada, not included within the above-mentioned limits, without a license, or after the expiration of the period named in the last license granted to such ship, vessel, or boat under the first section of this Act, such ship, vessel or boat, and the tackle, rigging, apparel, furniture, stores and cargo thereof shall be forfeited.
Page 274 - When two sailing ships are crossing so as to involve risk of collision, then if they have the wind on different sides, the ship with the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way...
Page 8 - The High Court of Admiralty shall have jurisdiction over any claim by the owner or consignee or assignee of any bill of lading of any goods carried into any port in England or Wales in any ship, for damage done to the goods or any part thereof by the negligence or misconduct of or for any breach of duty or breach of contract on the part of the owner, master, or crew...
Page 204 - It is not necessary, I conceive, that the distress should be actual or immediate, or that the danger should be imminent and absolute; it will be sufficient if, at the time the assistance is rendered, the ship has encountered any damage or misfortune which might possibly expose her to destruction if the services were not rendered.
Page 94 - Provided, however, that the American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever.
Page 99 - American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever. But they shall be under such restrictions as may be necessary to prevent their taking, drying or curing fish therein, or in any other manner whatever abusing the privileges hereby reserved to them.
Page 74 - And the United States hereby renounce forever, any liberty heretofore enjoyed or claimed by the inhabitants thereof, to take, dry, or cure fish on, or within three marine miles of any of the coasts, bays, creeks, or harbours of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Page 65 - Canada at any other place, or being brought into such port or place of entry by land or inland navigation, are carried past such custom house, or removed from the...
Page 114 - With regard to inevitable accident, the onus lies on those who bring a complaint against a Vessel, and who seek to be indemnified, — on them is the onus of proving that the blame does attach upon the Vessel proceeded against ; the onus of proving inevitable accident does not necessarily attach to that Vessel; it is only necessary when you show a prima facie case of negligence and want of due seamanship.

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